Archive for March, 2007

Google Books Now Included In Online Reference Collection at WorldVitalRecords.com

Friday, March 9th, 2007

Google Books Now Included In Online Reference Collection at WorldVitalRecords.com

WorldVitalRecords.com offers millions of genealogy and historical books for family history research

Provo, UT, March 9, 2007 – - Millions of books have been launched at WorldVitalRecords.com through Google Book Search, allowing genealogists access to a huge collection of genealogical and historical works.

“Under a mutual agreement between Google and WorldVitalRecords.com, we are using their technology to bring Google Book Search to our site. With hundreds of millions of dollars in scanning of books every year and millions of books being added on a regular basis, this is one of the greatest genealogical research tools ever created,” said Paul Allen, CEO, WorldVitalRecords.com.

Searching for ancestors in these books at WorldVitalRecords.com is easy and is accessible by typing in the name of the individual into the search box. Any books that contain matches for the individual will appear in the online reference collection, along with the results from our other online databases.

“We are showing innovation and providing a genealogy- specific Web mashup (type of collaboration in which multiple technologies, content, or applications, are combined with relevant, user-requested data to make a new product or service), and Web 2.0 features, as well as a better experience for our users than has ever been available before,” said David Lifferth, President, WorldVitalRecords.com.

WorldVitalRecords.com is constantly looking for solutions to help its members succeed and to connect them with the best research tools.

“With the simple touch of the search button on our site, any of our visitors or members are immediately provided with as many related links as possible to their queries,” said Yvette Arts, Director, Content Acquisition, WorldVitalRecords.com. “With the addition of the Google Book Search to our unique record collections, we now offer a broad spectrum of relevant content.”

Each Google book is free to access if it is public domain content, out of copyright, or if the publisher or shareholder has given permission for the book to be accessible for free. These online books are downloadable and can be saved, and printed as a PDF. All of the books have been made available through publishers and libraries.

“There are millions of public domain books that are extremely valuable and rare and are now available at WorldVitalRecords.com. These are not just English books. These are books from all over the world, and we are including them in our global search results at WorldvitalRecords.com. Many of these books are extremely valuable to genealogists because of their historical personal data. We consider this a huge edition to our online collection,” Lifferth said.

Each online book contains a section that lists bibliographic information, such as the title, author, subject and publication. Full text of some of the books is available at WorldVitalRecords.com. Other searches contain links that the user can click on to buy or borrow the book. Many individuals have tried out the search and have discovered links to their past through these Google books.

“I have a famous ancestor named Richard Pace who came from England in the 1500’s. He was an English diplomat of the Tudor period. I was curious to see if I could find information for him at WorldVitalRecords.com. I did one search for him and found a lot of actual letters that he had written to various cardinals. I was fascinated by the information I found on him and felt a connection to him that I had never felt before. It was really exciting,” said Brad Pace, VP Marketing, WorldVitalRecords.com.

xxx

Media Contact:

Whitney Ransom
Corporate Communications Director
World Vital Records

http://www.worldvitalrecords.com

whitney@worldvitalrecords.com

About WorldVitalRecords.com

Finding your ancestors can be overwhelming, and expensive. At WorldVitalRecords.com, we’ve made it easy and affordable for individuals to connect to their families and find answers to their genealogical questions. WorldVitalRecords.com was founded by Paul Allen, who also founded Ancestry.com, one of the leading genealogy companies. WorldVitalRecords.com aims to be a top player in the genealogy industry and will offer users international record databases, references to top genealogical resources, a blog planet, podcasts, videocasts, Webinars, expert advice, training, Google Book Search, and user-generated content.

11 New Parish Registers From England Added to WorldVitalRecords.com

Wednesday, March 7th, 2007

11 new English parish registers have recently been launched at WorldVitalRecords.com. All of these datasets are FREE to access for 10 days. Check out the list below, with a description of each dataset. Click on each link to access the records.

Armitage Parish Register
Armitage (or Armitage-with-Handsacre)has a very ancient history going back to evidence of a Roman battle happening there. Christianity was first thought to be brought to the area by Saint Chad in 672. It is thought that a church was later erected there by the Normans. The register contains baptism and burial records from 1673-1812 and marriage records from 1673-1754. From 1754-1812, the registers contains the usual paper marriage register issued after the passing of the Hardwick Marriages Act

Barton-under-Needwood Parish Register, Part 1
Barton-under-Needwood Parish Register, Part 1 is in the Deanery of Tutbury. It contains the baptism, marriage, and burial records on pages 1 -112. Some of the family names contained in the registers are: Holland, Grane, Allsopp, Duddell, Hanson, Webb, Whiteing, Cranidge or Cranage, Fox, Penifather, and Fewsdale.

Barton under Needwood Parish Register, Part 2
Barton under Needwood is in the Deanery of Tutbury. It contains the baptism, marriage, and burial records on pages 113-253. Some of the family names contained in the registers are: Holland, Grane, Allsopp, Duddell, Hanson, Webb, Whiteing, Cranidge or Cranage, Fox, Penifather, and Fewsdale.

Bilston Parish Register
The Bilton Parish Register not only includes the Parish baptisms, marriages and burials, but also contains lists of households and the occupations of residents. Reverend Richard Ames of Bilston during the years 1684-1730, kept fairly detailed records of life in his Parish. He also included little bits of the history of that area. This register is more than just lists kept by the Parish reverend; it is rich in the details that accompanies the entries.

Castle Church Parish Registers
Castle Church Registers. From the Everton Library Collection. The registers of Castle Church, Stafford contain baptism, marriage and burial records. Among the more noted families mentioned in the registers are the following: Aston, Barbor, Berington, Bickerton,Dovey of Ricarscote, Drakeford of Forbridge, Eardswick, Fowler, Harcourt, Hevey, Littleton, Macclesfield, Pursley, Stafford, Thorley, Whitgreave.

Hampshire Parish Registers, Volume 2
Hampshire Parish Registers, Volume 2 These registers contain the marraige records from 1586 to 1812. These registers contain the records from the following parishes: Penton Mewsey, Knight’s Enham, Monxton, Hurstbourne Tarrant, St. Mary Bourne, Hurstbourne Priors, Bullington, Tufton, Bramley, Dummer, Steventon, Deane, Wootton St. Lawrence, Cliddesden.

Hampshire Parish Registers, Volume 10
Hampshire Parish Registers, Volume 10 This contains the Marriage Register of a great seaport. The most notable wedding recorded in this register is that of King Charles the Second to Queen Katherine in 1662. Regrettably, these registers seem to begin at a late date.

Hampshire Parish Registers, Volume 15
Hampshire Parish Registers, Volume 15. Volume 15 is a continuation of the tenth volume of the Hampshire series. It covers the marriages for the years 1701-1775.

The Registers of Harley, Shropshire 1745 -1812
The Registers of Harley, Shropshire 1745 -1812. From the Everton Library Collection. Some of the earlier registers of Harley have disappeared. The existing registers of Harley begin in 1745. They contain entries of baptisms, marriages, and burials through 1812. Families found in the records are: Harnage, Sprott, Corfield, and Lacon

The Registers of Melverley, Shropshire 1723 – 1812
The Registers of Melverley, Shropshire 1723 – 1812. From the Everton Library Collection. These registers contain, Baptism, Marriage and burial records for Melverley from 1723-1812. Some pages contain a memoranda relating to the Church Restoration and the Reopening Services.

The Registers of the Parish Church of Cherry Burton, Co. York 1561 – 1740
The Registers of the Parish Church of Cherry Burton, Co. York 1561 – 1740. From the Everton Library Collection. These registers contain the birth, marriage, and burial records for the years 1561-1740. The papers also contain an account of the collections made for different objects and various payments made.

Unlimited Storage at WorldVitalRecords.com – From Paul Allen, CEO

Tuesday, March 6th, 2007

Here is an update from our CEO, Paul Allen, regarding our unlimited storage capacity at WorldVitalRecords.com.

World Vital Records recently added new hardware to triple our searching capacity and almost 10 times our storage capacity for images. This allows us to collect family trees and historical photos as well as post newspaper images much faster. Our images server now has over 7 terabytes of storage. All of our searching is done using 64 bit operating systems on quad processor boxes with 8 gig of ram.

In addition to bulking up our own server capacity, we are signing on with Amazon’s S3 web service so that we can basically have unlimited storage capacity as index and host genealogical record collections from around the world.

Jeff Barr (visit his blog) who evangelizes Amazon’s web services recently spoke at the Provo Labs Academy and convinced many of us there that Amazon’s huge investments in this area mean that smaller companies can utilize the vast computing and storage power that Amazon is providing to us. We love their passion for this new business. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos spoke at the Web 2.0 Summit last November and was interviewed by TechCrunch: he sounds very committed to this new line of business. I liked this comment on the TechCrunch blog:

Kalpesh Patel: “This is heaven for startups. Imagine having the power of provisioning unlimited space and unlimited computing power. You are actually building your apps using 10-15 years of experience already behind you taking care of scalability and reliability issues. I am very much excited about it. EC2 is still in infant stage but definitely has an early movers advantage in this space. I wonder VMware guys must be having nightmares when it really rocks in.”

With this kind of “unlimited space and unlimited computing power” we can offer free hosting to large non-profit genealogical organizations that have their own web sites and we can work in a flexible manner with anyone who has a large genealogical database that they want us to index, or host, or link to original images. The possibilities are just not constrained by hardware anymore.

Our team is really jazzed about our new inhouse capacity and the unlimited capacity that we get through Amazon’s S3 services.

How Do I Obtain Copies of Original Vital Records?

Monday, March 5th, 2007

Many genealogists, when trying to link families together, are in a desperate search for vital information. That is to say, births, marriage, and death records. Some people contact WorldVitalRecords.com for their own personal birth certificates or death certificates trying to gain access to these records through our genealogical database site.As WorldVitalRecords.com grows, we are working on bringing our clients as many vital records as possible for the different geographical areas for which users have interest. We are in process of making agreements with various countries to help with digitization and indexing in order to make the records easily available online. In the meantime, however, there are other methods for obtaining vital certificates quickly.One way that the author has found to be an effective method for retrieving vital records quickly is to use an online service called VitalChek.com. During a recent research project, this site allowed for rapid access to death records of various family members in order to prove relationships through direct evidence.

VitalChek.com provides express vital records delivery from 400 government agencies including counties within all 50 United States states, and internationally: American Citizens Born Abroad, Panama Canal Zone, American Territories: American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, St. Thomas and St. John, Canada: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick , Newfoundland, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Yukon Territory, Mexico, United Kingdom: England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland.

The author of this article has had very good success with vital records orders from VitalChek, especially for death records from Pennsylvania. One item of note, however, is that vital records from this service are of a more-recent nature. Records earlier than those listed in the Handybook for Genealogists from each county clerk are probably not available from this company. For earlier records, write or email the County Clerk for the area in question.

VitalChek.com has the addresses and numbers for their international connections listed on their website.

Average cost varies depending upon the state, with New York possibly being on the more expensive end, towards $70 per certificate, and Pennsylvania being less expensive at $29 per certificate. This is not a free service, especially for receiving expedited vital records, but for those who need the record now, or are willing to pay the fees, it is an excellent service that delivers what it promises.

Soundex and Double Metaphone: Explanation of New Search Methods at WorldVitalRecords.com

Monday, March 5th, 2007

The following is an explanation of the logic behind the search engines used by WorldVitalRecords.com’s Quick and Advanced Search. Due to the technical nature of the definitions of these algorithms, most of the article will be taken directly from the original reference materials with endnotes explaining sources.Soundex:

“Soundex and Metaphone belong to a class of algorithms usually known as “phonetic encoding” or “sound alike” algorithms – a heuristic type of fuzzy matching. They input a word or name, and return an encoded key, which should be the same for any words that are pronounced similarly – allowing for a reasonable amount of fuzziness..”

“Soundex was developed by Robert Russell and Margaret Odell and patented in 1918 and 1922 (U.S. Patent 1,261,167 and U.S. Patent 1,435,663 ). A variation called American Soundex was used in the 1930s for a retrospective analysis of the US censuses from 1890 through 1920. The Soundex code for a name consists of a letter followed by three numbers: the letter is the first letter of the name, and the numbers encode the remaining consonants. Similar sounding consonants share the same number so, for example, the labial B, F, P and V are all encoded as 1. Vowels can affect the coding, but are never coded directly unless they appear at the start of the name.

The exact algorithm is as follows:
1. Retain the first letter of the string
2. Remove all occurrences of the following letters, unless it is the first letter: a, e, h, i, o, u, w, y
3. Assign numbers to the remaining letters (after the first) as follows:
o b, f, p, v = 1
o c, g, j, k, q, s, x, z = 2
o d, t = 3
o l = 4
o m, n = 5
o r = 6

4. If two or more letters with the same number were adjacent in the original name (before step 1), or adjacent except for any intervening h and w (American census only), then omit all but the first.

5. Return the first four characters, right-padding with zeroes if there are fewer than four.

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) maintains the rule set for the official implementation of Soundex used by the U.S. Government.

Using this algorithm, both “Robert” and “Rupert” return the same string “R163″ while “Rubin” yields “R150″.”

Double Metaphone

Metaphone was developed by Lawrence Philips as a response to deficiencies in the Soundex algorithm. It is more accurate than Soundex because it “understands” the basic rules of English pronunciation. …The original author later produced a new version of the algorithm, which he named Double Metaphone, that produces more accurate results than the original algorithm. Its implementation was described in the June 2000 issue of C/C++ Users Journal.

The algorithm produces keys as its output. Similar sounding words share the same keys and are of variable length.

It is called “Double” because it can return both a primary and a secondary code for a string; this accounts for some ambiguous cases as well as for multiple variants of surnames with common ancestry. For example, encoding the name “Smith” yields a primary code of SM0 and a secondary code of XMT, while the name “Schmidt” yields a primary code of XMT and a secondary code of SMT–both have XMT in common.

Double Metaphone tries to account for myriad irregularities in English of Slavic, Germanic, Celtic, Greek, French, Italian, Spanish, Chinese, and other origin. Thus it uses a much more complex ruleset for coding than its predecessor; for example, it tests for approximately 100 different contexts of the use of the letter C alone.

That is why [he] decided to give back two keys for words and names that can be plausibly pronounced more than one way, and that’s why the new version is called Double Metaphone. In the case of Kuczewski, there are two ambiguous sounds, so in the second key returned I make both of the changes: “Kuczewski” now comes back as KSSK for the American version, “Kuhzooski,” as well as KXFS for “Kutchefski.” (I use ‘X’ to represent the “sh” sound, and ‘0′, zero, to represent “th,” as in original Metaphone.) Both versions are likely to be heard in the United States, so it is necessary to try both to be really sure! In the end, however, I find that only about 10% of [the] sample database of the 100,000 most common American surnames come out with more than one key…

The current version of Double Metaphone [used at WorldVitalRecords.com] accounts for alternate pronounciations of names from Italian, Spanish, and French, and from various Germanic and Slavic languages. A few exceptions from English names and words, such as “Thames” and “sugar,” are accounted for also.

The appropriate context for some alternate pronounciations, such as “Zivis-ky” for “Ziwicki,” and “Ro-jay” for a French pronounciation of “Roger,” are too difficult calculate, and so are not given.

[Philips] tried to give back the pronounciation most likely to be heard in the U.S. in the first key, and the native sound in the second key. However, for names like “Artois,” most Americans will correctly drop the ‘s,’ so it comes back as ART first. Most [A]mericans are also likely to give a correct Spanish reading for “Jose” at first glance.

Since many families have changed their last names to a more anglicized spelling, [he has] included “etymological” variations, especially useful for genealogical research, a common application of both Soundex and Metaphone. To this end, consonant groups such as “Schm-” and “-wicz” are automatically given back with the common anglicizations, although they do not really sound the same according to the usual standards of phonetic similarity. But they will allow you to match “Smith” to “Schmidt,” “Filipowicz” to “Philipowitz,” and “Jablonski” to “Yablonsky.”

The idea for using both Soundex and Double Metaphone in matching surnames is to allow for more-thorough searching of the WorldVitalRecords.com website. No genealogist can say that the surname(s) they are searching for has been spelled correctly since the beginning of the use of their surname. English spelling was not standardized until Noah Webster’s A Compendius Dictionary of the English Language in 1806, and through various volumes of that dictionary, English has further evolved.

Using Soundex and Double Metaphone algorithms for searching allows for the changes to American English over time including the use of words from other languages ensuring that WorldVitalRecords.com is able to give a truly international approach to its searching measures.

 

Footnotes:

Lawrence Philips. “The Double Metaphone Search Algorithm,” Mr. Dobb’s Portal: C++. 15 Apr 2003, 2. [Accessed Online 2 Mar 2007.]
“Soundex” Wikipedia.com, (Wikimedia Foundation: St. Petersburg, Florida), 18 Jan 2007. [Accessed Online. 2 Mar 2007.]
Ibid.
Lawrence Philips, “The Double Metaphone Search Algorithm”. Mr. Dobb’s Portal: C++.

WorldVitalRecords.com Launches 100 Genealogy Databases

Monday, March 5th, 2007

WorldVitalRecords.com Launches 100 Genealogy Databases

WorldVitalRecords.com launches its largest collection of vital records

Provo, UT, March 5, 2007 – - WorldVitalRecords.com recently launched 100 genealogy databases, the largest collection of vital records it has ever launched in one day.

“This is huge. Only a dozen or so companies have 100 or more genealogy-specific databases on their site. WorldVitalRecords.com has released 100 in a single day! This is a testimonial to our team of content acquisition, engineers, as well as our content partners who are choosing WorldVitalRecords.com to host their valuable information,” said David Lifferth, President, WorldVitalRecords.com.

All of the datasets that have been launched will be FREE until March 10, 2007. Many of these datasets have come from books located at the Everton Library that have recently been scanned. A few of the 100 datasets include the following: Marriages and Deaths Dutchess County, New York 1778 – 1825, Mayflower Descendents in Cape May County 1620 – 1920, Stratford-on-Avon, Marriages 1558-1812, Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine Volumes 1-6, Crumrine History of Borough and Township Records Washington County, Pennsylvania, New York Directory 1786, Rochester Vital Records, Shrewbury Vital Records, Stratford Burials, Massachusetts Vital Records, Canadian Birth, Marriage, and Death Notices 1871-1910, Gardiner, Maine Vital Records, Virginia Marriages Volumes 1-15.

“We would like to make a big splash with the combination of these 100 datasets. We have gathered a lot of small to medium datasets from the United States and across the world, and we are excited to share these records,” said Yvette Arts, Director, Content Acquisition, WorldVitalRecords.com.

xxx

Media Contact:

Whitney Ransom
Corporate Communications Director
World Vital Records

http://www.worldvitalrecords.com

whitney@worldvitalrecords.com

About WorldVitalRecords.com

Finding your ancestors can be overwhelming, and expensive. At WorldVitalRecords.com, we’ve made it easy and affordable for individuals to connect to their families and find answers to their genealogical questions. Led by Paul Allen, who after founding Ancestry.com, which became the largest genealogy company in the world, now aims to be the number two player in the genealogy industry with WorldVitalRecords.com. WorldVitalRecords.com will offer users international record databases, references to top genealogical resources, a blog planet, podcasts, videocasts, Webinars, expert advice, training, and user-generated content.

New Database From Sweden: Förteckning Över Emigranter Fran O Stergotland

Friday, March 2nd, 2007

Förteckning Över Emigranter Fran O Stergotland is WorldVitalRecords.com’s first database from Sweden. This database will be FREE to access until March 11th.

The database contains a list of emigrant records from 1851-1860. Within the database is a list of all of the names of the heads of households and single persons that applied for passports at the county government office in Linkoping.

The passport journals were later copied in 1856 and 1861 and were sent to the Tabellverket in Stockholm. This list is a transcription from the microfilm of the copies in Tabellverket.

The content for this database was provided by Elisabeth Thorsell of Järfälla, Sweden, editor of Släkthistoriskt Forum (1992-2001), and also co-author of various manuals on Swedish genealogy. Thorsell also has a great deal of experience in doing Swedish research for Americans.

This is our 100 database day!

Thursday, March 1st, 2007

On March 1, 2007, WorldVitalRecords.com launched 100 databases, the largest collection of vital records it has ever launched in one day.

“We would like to make a big splash with the combination of these 100 datasets. We have gathered a lot of small to medium datasets from the United States and across the world, and we are excited to share these records,” said Yvette Arts, Director, Content Acquisition, WorldVitalRecords.com.

Many of these datasets have come from books located at the Everton Library that have recently been scanned. Others include records from the SmallTownPapers® Collection.

A few of the datasets that will be available on March 1st include the following:

Marriages and Deaths Dutchess County, New York 1778 – 1825
Mayflower Descendents in Cape May County 1620 – 1920
Stratford-on-Avon, Marriages 1558-1812
UT Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine Vol 1
UT Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine Vol 3
UT Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine Vol 4
UT Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine Vol 5
UT Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine Vol 6
PA Crumrine History of Borough and Township Records Washington County, Pennsylvania
Samuel MacMillan Manuscript
Raymond M. Bell Anthology
NY New York Directory 1786
History of the Kimball Family
History of Bethel
History of Dover

Rhode Island vital records

Rochester vital records
Shrewbury vital records
MA Concord, MA Births
MA Concord, MA Marriages
MA Concord, MA deaths
Stratford burials
CAN Birth notices from the Renfrew Mercury 1871-1900
CAN Marriage notices from the Renfrew Mercury 1871-1900
CAN Death notices from the Renfrew Mercury 1871-1900
CAN Birth notices from the Renfrew Mercury 1901-1910
CAN Marriage notices from the Renfrew Mercury 1901-1910
CAN Death notices from the Renfrew Mercury 1901-1910
ME Gardiner, Maine vital records
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 1
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 2
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 3
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 4
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 5
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 6
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 7
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 8
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 9
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 10
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 11
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 12
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 13
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 14
VA Virginia Marriages Vol. 15
ME The Press of Maine
AL Pinson News (Pinson, Alabama)
AL Tuskegee News (Tuskegee, Alabama)
AZ San Manuel Miner (San Manuel, Arizona)
AZ San Pedro Valley News-Sun (Benson, Arizona)
AZ Superior Sun (Superior, Arizona)
CA Portola Reporter (Portola, California)
CA Westwood PinePress (Westwood, California)
CO San Miguel Basin Forum (Nucla, Colorado)
CO Trinidad Times Independent (Trinidad, Colorado)
CO Wellington Tribune (Wellington, Colorado)
GA Manchester Star-Mercury (Manchester, Georgia)
GA Meriwether Vindicator (Greenville, Georgia)
GA Talbotton New Era (Talbotton, Georgia)
IA Sioux County Index-Reporter (Hull, Iowa)
IA West Lyon Herald (Inwood, Iowa)
ID Weiser Signal American (Weiser, Idaho)
IL Mt. Zion Region News (Mt. Zion, Illinois)
IL News Record (Cerro Gordo, Illinois)
IN North Manchester News-Journal (North Manchester, Indiana
IN Terry Turner’s Starke County NewsHawk (Hamlet, Indiana)
IN Warren Weekly (Warren, Indiana)
KS Prairie Post (White City, Kansas)
KS Wabaunsee County Signal-Enterprise (Alma, Kansas)
KS Western Star (Coldwater, Kansas)
MA Post Gazette (Boston, Massachusetts)
MA Vineyard Gazette (Edgartown, Massachusetts)
ME New Gloucester Independent (New Gloucester, Maine)
ME Original Irregular (Kingfield, Maine)
MI Montmorency County Tribune (Atlanta, Michigan)
MN Sentinel Tribune (Westbrook, Minnesota)
MN Tyler Tribute (Tyler, Minnesota)
MS Southern Herald (Liberty, Mississippi)
MS Stone County Enterprise (Wiggins, Mississippi)
MT Phillips County News (Malta, Montana)
NC Southerner (Welcome, North Carolina)
NC Sylva Herald & Ruralite (Sylva, North Carolina)
ND Mouse River Journal (Towner, North Dakota)
ND Valley News & Views (Drayton, North Dakota)
ND Walsh County Press (Park River, North Dakota)
NM Raton Range (Raton, New Mexico)
OK Nowata Star (Nowata, Oklahoma)
OK Stillwater Journal (Stillwater, Oklahoma)
OK Valliant Leader (Valliant, Oklahoma)
OR Pendleton Record (Pendleton, Oregon)
SD Marion Record (Marion, South Dakota)
SD Montrose Herald (Montrose, South Dakota)
TX Stonewall County Courier (Aspermont, Texas)
TX Trammel Trace Tribune (Tatum, Texas)
TX Wood County Democrat (Quitman, Texas)
UT Leader (Tremonton, Utah)
WA Mattawa Area News (Mattawa, Washington)
WA Newcastle News (Newcastle, Washington)
WA Quad City Herald (Brewster, Washington)
WA Sammamish Review (Sammamish, Washington)
WA South County Sun (Royal City, Washington)
WA Woodinville Weekly (Woodinville, Washington)
WV Preston County Journal (Kingwood, West Virginia)
WV Times Record (Spencer, West Virginia)
WV Wirt County Journal (Elizabeth, West Virginia)

Genealogical Helper With Two-Year Subscription Offer To Continue Until March 5th

Thursday, March 1st, 2007

WorldVitalRecords.com’s current special offer: Buy a two-year subscription for $74.90 and receive a one-year subscription to the Genealogical Helper for FREE will continue until March 5th! Sign up now!

We are in the process of changing our products and offerings and will have our new marketing materials ready by March 5th. We will make our current Genealogical Helper offer available until this time.

This is the first time we have ever given away this magazine for free. The Genealogical Helper concentrates on content, continuing education, and research resources, for both professional genealogists and amateur family history researchers.

Each issue of the Genealogical Helper contains:

  • Consistent Focus on Continuing Education
  • Expanded Sections on Missing Ancestors and Family Members
  • Articles by Previously Unpublished Writers (our readers)
  • In-Depth Articles by Professionals
  • Expanded Book Reviews
  • Renewed Emphasis on Personal Connections/Introductions
  • Comprehensive Coverage of Technological Advances/Digital/Online Research
  • Over 10,000 Pages Representing Over 200 Issues From 1947 to the Present.