New GPC Content from England, Ireland, US, and Wales

Posted by on

The Major Collection this week at WorldVitalRecords.com contains a wide variety
of new databases from Genealogical Publishing Company. The databases include directories,
trees, histories, vital records, court records, and guides from England, Ireland,
the United States (Maryland, Massachusetts and Maine, New York, North Carolina,
Virginia) and Wales.


Special Report On Surnames in Ireland

Sir Robert E. Matheson. (1901, 1909). These two works-in-one are a valuable instrument
for tracing Irish family origins. The first, the Special Report, shows the areas
in Ireland with which family names are most frequently associated. In fact, it has
a 39-page table listing of about 2,400 surnames, alphabetically arranged, indicating
the number of occurrences of each surname in the various provinces and counties
of Ireland. Varieties and Synonymes of Surnames, the second report, consists of
a 32-page list of 2,091 names and their variations as well as a separate key to
the Registers’ Districts and Unions in which the surnames are located.


Massachusetts and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis (1885-1966)

Walter Goodwin Davis. (1916-1963). Reprinted in these three volumes are seventeen
books that comprise one of the major achievements of twentieth-century genealogy–the
multi-ancestor compendium plus Thomas Haley of Winter Harbor and His Descendants,
1930) compiled and published by Walter Goodwin Davis between 1916 and 1963. These
2,100 fully-indexed pages authoritatively cover 180 families, all of Davis’s colonial
forebears plus nineteen English families in the immediate ancestry of American immigrants.
One hundred fourteen of these families lived mostly in Massachusetts; twenty-nine
are associated largely with Maine; and eighteen–Basford, Brown, Clifford, Cram,
Estow, Fernald, Folsom, Gibbons, Gilman, Marston, Moses, Roberts, Roper, Sherburne,
Sloper, Taprill, Walton, and Waterhouse–lived largely in New Hampshire, primarily
Hampton, Portsmouth, or Exeter. Most of the 114 Massachusetts families resided in
Essex County, a few in Middlesex or Plymouth counties, or in Boston. Thus Massachusetts
and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis is largely a compendium
on “north of Boston” families.

The Davis opus is undoubtedly the premier work for northern New England, and an
often essential companion volume to the celebrated Genealogical Dictionary of Maine
and New Hampshire, which it considerably expands, especially for many Essex County
families with ties further north)–and the greatest multi-ancestor series to date
in American genealogy. Almost anyone with considerable New England ancestry–and
as many as 100 million living Americans, about 40 percent of the population, have
some colonial New England forebears–will descend from one or more, often a dozen
or more, of the 180 families herein. For this reprint edition, the 180 families
in all sixteen books have been arranged into a single alphabetical sequence, and
tables of contents identify the book in which the family originally appeared.


Records of Old Macon County, North Carolina, 1829-1850

Barbara Sears McRae. (1991). “Old” Macon County, North Carolina at one time included
all the land from the Blue Ridge on the east to the state boundaries of South Carolina,
Georgia, and Tennessee. In 1820, a survey party mapped the new territory, which
remained part of Haywood County until 1828, the year Macon County was established.
At the outset, “Old” Macon County included all or part of the present-day western
North Carolina counties of Macon, Jackson, Swain, Transylvania, Cherokee, Clay,
and Graham, and it would serve as a stop on the trail leading west for migrants
from the adjoining areas of North Carolina, the South Carolina upstate, and parts
of Georgia and Tennessee.

For this original Clearfield book, Barbara Sears McRae has abstracted Macon County
Deed Books A-E (1829-1850) to yield an accounting of the county’s earliest settlers.
Each abstract typically identifies the buyer and seller of the land, the date of
the transaction, the location of the land transferred, and the names of witnesses.
Ms. McRae also provides an index to over 4,000 persons named in the records, a separate
index to slave transactions, and an index to places. All in all, a beautifully executed
work destined to be regarded as the starting point for Macon County genealogical
research.


Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry. Volume 2

Marston Watson. (2004). Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson, declared among some in her seventeenth-century
world as a religious “heretic,” defied many of the most powerful men in the Massachusetts
Bay Colony, including Governor Thomas Dudley, in defense of her strong beliefs.
She endured a “trial by fire,” without benefit of a jury of her peers, in a highly
charged court where these men challenged and mocked her views on religion. Her banishment
from Salem and Boston drove her to a new colony called Rhode Island, which her mentor
and friend Roger Williams co-founded.

Thousands of Americans can claim the Marbury family’s lineal connections to their
royal and noble ancestry, from William the Conqueror through Edward I. These ancestors
include John, King of England, who signed the Magna Carta in 1215 at Runnymede,
as well as many of the barons who witnessed his signature on that famous document.
All later kinds of Spain, Holy Roman and Austrian emperors, most later English and
French kinds, all kings of Prussia and Russian czars, beginning with Alexander I,
are distant cousins as well.

This volume is the second in a projected multi-volume series dealing with Americans
of royal and noble ancestry. Taking the colonial period as a point of departure,
it focuses on two of Reverend Francis Marbury’s daughters, Anne and Katherine, who
immigrated with their husbands to the New World in the 1630s. It covers the first
five generations of their descendants, carrying the various lines up to and beyond
the Revolutionary War, into the sixth generation. The generational layout of the
work follows a modified format of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register,
with citations for all five generations based exclusively on vital records and approved
family histories.

The book concludes with an every-name index of several thousand entries and a comprehensive
bibliography. In addition, the author appended a “Lineage Society Index” with names
of eligible ancestors in a number of hereditary societies, including the Colonial
Clergy, Colonial Governors, Mayflower Descendants, and Revolutionary War Patriots.


Landholders of Northeastern New York, 1739-1802

Fred Q. Bowman. (1983). This work forms a directory of all participants in all land
sales and mortgage agreements in northeastern New York between 1739 and 1802. The
area covered includes all land within the present-day counties of Clinton, Essex,
Franklin, Warren, and Washington.

The first part identifies original grantees, persons awarded land in the area between
1739 and 1775, and provided is the date of award, name of grant, present town of
grant’s location, acreage, and grantee’s name. The second part, and by far the largest,
identifies about 9,000 landholders–grantees, grantors, mortgagees and mortgagors–whose
land records were filed between 1772 and 1802 in the deed and mortgage books of
Washington, Clinton, or Essex counties. In the various entries will be found the
names of all persons engaged in land transactions, the date of the transaction,
the place of residence of each of the principals, and the volume and page of the
original source book.

An appendix furnishes the dates of organization of all of the towns formed in northeastern
New York prior to 1803 and the population of these towns as of 1790 and 1800, and
it lists by counties the numbers of deeds and mortgages filed in this region between
1772 and 1802.


Ages from Court Records, 1636-1700: Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts

Melinde Lutz Sanborn. (2003) From thousands of court cases in Essex, Middlesex,
and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts, dating from 1636 to 1700, Melinde Sanborn has
extracted the names of all deponents and witnesses whose ages are given in the court
records of those counties. Depositions provided in early court records are among
the richest sources of personal information surviving from New England’s first century,
and Ms. Sanborn argues that “so many people in early New England were deponents
for one reason or another that no biography or genealogy can be complete without
a search through court records to see if a pertinent deposition exists.”

For this early period, the single most useful bit of evidence included in the depositions
is the age of the deponent. While most depositions vary in quality from being virtually
useless to providing corroboration of marriages, wills, and deeds, ages alone provide
incontrovertible value to the genealogist. Sometimes the age of a deponent was very
important to a particular case. Men over sixty, for example, were often brought
into court to support the claims of the ancient boundaries of litigants’ property.
Likewise, many older women who were experienced midwives were called upon to offer
opinions on the timeliness of a birth in a fornication case.

Also, one of the most common errors in genealogical work is confusing two or more
individuals of the same name. If senior or junior or tertius is not used, it is
very difficult to assign events to the correct individual. Frequently, fathers and
sons with the same given name came to court together, but with stated ages they
are easily differentiated. Men with the same name and of the same generation can
be another problem, but again a deposition with a specific age given can make all
the difference.

With this index–which lists the names and ages of 11,000 deponents, and the year
and source of the court records–researchers can quickly determine whether it is
worthwhile to track down the original court record.

Maryland and Virginia Colonials: Genealogies of Some Colonial Families
Volume 1 and
Volume 2

Sharon J. Doliante. (1991). Here is a true giant of a work, covering in full some
twenty-two colonial Maryland and Virginia families and also treating hundreds of
collateral families. Mrs. Doliante not only establishes the Virginia and Maryland
ancestry of the twenty-two main families, but also corrects many longstanding inaccuracies
and dispels some cherished myths, many repeated uncritically in one publication
after another, such as the non-existent fourth wife of Henry Ridgley, the erroneous
ancestry of Richard Duckett, Sr., and the putative maternity of the Sprigg children.

The physical specifications of the book are in themselves impressive. There are
over 1,200 pages of text, more than 150 illustrations, a bibliography, a place name
index, and an index of personal names with over 23,500 entries! In addition to the
standard sources both in print and manuscript, the author has had recourse to a
wide range of private and public records to substantiate her facts. Hence the book
is amply furnished with transcriptions of such records as wills, inventories, and
Bible records. Little will be found wanting here, and for those who are interested
in these families, from their origins in Maryland or Virginia up to recent times,
it is gratifying to know that someone has spared them the drudgery of sifting through
thousands of pages of court records.


Records of Old Macon County, North Carolina, 1829-1850

Barbara Sears McRae. (1991). “Old” Macon County, North Carolina at one time included
all the land from the Blue Ridge on the east to the state boundaries of South Carolina,
Georgia, and Tennessee. In 1820, a survey party mapped the new territory, which
remained part of Haywood County until 1828, the year Macon County was established.
At the outset, “Old” Macon County included all or part of the present-day western
North Carolina counties of Macon, Jackson, Swain, Transylvania, Cherokee, Clay,
and Graham, and it would serve as a stop on the trail leading west for migrants
from the adjoining areas of North Carolina, the South Carolina upstate, and parts
of Georgia and Tennessee.

For this original Clearfield book, Barbara Sears McRae has abstracted Macon County
Deed Books A-E (1829-1850) to yield an accounting of the county’s earliest settlers.
Each abstract typically identifies the buyer and seller of the land, the date of
the transaction, the location of the land transferred, and the names of witnesses.
Ms. McRae also provides an index to over 4,000 persons named in the records, a separate
index to slave transactions, and an index to places. All in all, a beautifully executed
work destined to be regarded as the starting point for Macon County genealogical
research.


Lewis of Warner Hall: History of a Family
(Free for 10 Days!)

Merrow E. Sorley. The Lewis family of Warner Hall, York County, Va. probably descends
from Robert Lewis of Brecon, Wales who came to Virginia in 1635. This book traces
his descendants in the male and female lines, and descents from other early Virginia
families. The bulk of this work is concerned with Col. John Lewis and Francis Fielding
and their descendants, Col. Charles Lewis and Mary Howell and their descendants,
and Col. Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether and their descendants, with much attention
given to these related families: Ambler, Ball, Barret, Bowles, Bushrod, Byrd, Carter,
Cobbs, Crawford, Eppes, Fauntleroy, Fielding, Griffin, Howell, Isham, Jefferson,
Kennon, Marshall, Piersey, Ragland, Randolph, Taliaferro, Taylor, Thompson, Walker,
Washington, Willis, Woodson, and Worsham.


Record Offices–How to Find Them

Since the redrawing of county boundaries in 1974 there has been a wholesale change
in the location of record offices in England and Wales. There are now many new county
record offices, new archive departments (even certain divisions of the Public Record
Office in London have changed location), and many consolidated and reconstituted
diocesan record offices. This guide is designed to help you locate these record
offices, and it contains maps to guide you to them. It also has addresses, phone
numbers, a list of relevant publications, and a variety of information pertaining
to each of the record offices in England and Wales. In this Ninth Edition the outstandingly
important relocations are in Central London. The closure of the historic Public
Record Office building in Chancery Lane (with transfer of all original records to
Kew) and the relocation of General Registry Office records of births, marriages
and deaths has brought into being the Family Records Centre, with its holdings of
G.R.O. indexes, microfilmed census records, and P.C.C. wills.


Landholders of Northeastern New York, 1739-1802

This work forms a directory of all participants in all land sales and mortgage agreements
in northeastern New York between 1739 and 1802. The area covered includes all land
within the present-day counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Warren, and Washington.

The first part identifies original grantees, persons awarded land in the area between
1739 and 1775, and provided is the date of award, name of grant, present town of
grant’s location, acreage, and grantee’s name. The second part, and by far the largest,
identifies about 9,000 landholders–grantees, grantors, mortgagees and mortgagors–whose
land records were filed between 1772 and 1802 in the deed and mortgage books of
Washington, Clinton, or Essex counties. In the various entries will be found the
names of all persons engaged in land transactions, the date of the transaction,
the place of residence of each of the principals, and the volume and page of the
original source book.

An appendix furnishes the dates of organization of all of the towns formed in northeastern
New York prior to 1803 and the population of these towns as of 1790 and 1800, and
it lists by counties the numbers of deeds and mortgages filed in this region between
1772 and 1802.


Genealogical & Local History Books in Print: General Reference & World Resources
Volume: Fifth Edition

The General Reference and World Resources Volume lists genealogical books in print
that fit into the categories of general reference or world resources, and the book
is arranged under those two principal classifications. Therein, under headings ranging
from adoption, Bible records, and bibliography to textbooks, vital records, and
westward migration, the General Reference section lists thousands of genealogical
books in print; while the World Resources section lists publications covering countries
throughout the world, from Australia, Britain, and Germany to Italy, Switzerland,
and the West Indies.

Alphabetically arranged by authors’ names or the names of sponsoring institutions,
the entries, typically, give the name of the author, the full title of the work,
date of publication, whether indexed or illustrated, in cloth or paper, number of
pages, selling price, and vendor number (publisher, bookseller, etc.). Vendors are
listed separately in the front of the book, both numerically and alphabetically,
with addresses and special ordering information given to enable the reader to place
orders. In addition, for maximum convenience in your research, the book contains
an index of authors and an index of titles. An easier or better method of locating
books can hardly be imagined!


Pocahontas, Alias Matoaka

Wyndham Robertson. This work is the precursor to the new, consolidated volume on
Pocahontas above. Chiefly a tabulation of names, although many dates of birth, marriage
and death are given, this work traces the descendants of Pocahontas and John Rolfe
through seven generations. Names covered include Alfriend, Archer, Bentley, Bernard,
Bland, Bolling, Branch, Cabell, Catlett, Cary, Dandridge, Dixon, Douglas, Duval,
Eldridge, Ellett, Ferguson, Field, Fleming, Gay, Gordon, Griffon, Grayson, Harrison,
Hubard, Lewis, Logan, Markham, Meade, McRae, Murray, Page, Poythress, Randolph,
Robertson, Skipwith, Stanard, Tazewell, Walke, West, and Whittle.


Side Lights of Maryland History: The Davis Family and Coat of Arms

Hester Dorsey Richardson. (1913). This landmark of Maryland genealogy consists of
a large number of meticulously researched articles which were designed, in part,
to counter the “scurrilous” claim that Maryland was settled largely by convicts
and indentured servants. It is as a compilation of family histories and source records
that the work shines, however, for it is the embodiment of the very best in genealogical
orthodoxy.

Volume I contains seventy-five chapters, or articles, on a variety of subjects,
among them articles on the passengers on the Ark and the Dove, the first Maryland
settlers, muster rolls of colonial militia, original members of the Society of the
Cincinnati in Maryland, the names of 1,000 early settlers in Maryland with their
land surveys, Scotch exiles in Maryland, etc. Volume II consists entirely of genealogical
sketches which carry over 100 Maryland families back to the immigrant ancestor.

Armorial General: Two Volumes-
Volume 2
and
Volume 3

The Armorial General series, described hereunder, is a multi-volume work on the
coats of arms of the world; it is both monumental and without equal, and is the
most exhaustive undertaking of its kind. Needless to say, the volumes are in French,
but the information is stereotyped, and easily understood.

The Armorial General is the most authoritative work on the coats of arms in the
world. The descriptions of the arms cover those of more than 100,000 families, alphabetically
arranged and accurately described. The work was compiled from hundreds of armorials
and it contains an extensive glossary of terms. In addition to a full description
of the arms, most entries identify the nationality of the arms bearer, his title,
and the date his title was conferred. The basic text was established with the publication
of the second edition, corrected and enlarged, of 1884-1887. In 1950 a reprint was
published in a limited edition of 250 copies, with a new Preface and new Additions
and Corrections. The present reprint is an exact reproduction of this 1950 edition.
It is the best edition available and the first to appear in America.

“. . . it should be in any library with a reference collection of any size, and
in any genealogy and heraldry and museum library.” –Library Journal (July 1965).

Leave a comment