Archive for 2009

Steve Nickle Gives Sneak Preview About GenSeek on Genealogy Gems Podcast

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

Recently the Genealogy Gems Podcast featured Steve Nickle, President, FamilyLink.com,
Inc. Lisa Louise Cooke is the host for this podcast. Click here to view the podcast.
Direct download:Episode_61.mp3

During the interview, Nickle shares some exciting news about an upcoming Website
FamilyLink.com, Inc. is preparing to launch called GenSeek.

Here are some additional excerpts from Cook’s podcast page about the episode:

I am just back from attending the Family History Expo in St. George
Utah. And once again my Google classes were packed! In fact I got word that both
my Google: A Goldmine of Genealogy Gems Parts 1 and 2 classes broke attendance records.

We talked about how to set up a genealogy iGoogle page, Google Alerts, Site Search
and a wide range of brand new Google tools that can be used to move your research
forward.

MAILBOX: I got an email from Tina Kelly who lives in the United Kingdom and she
has a question about obtaining vital records here in the U.S. and since I have lots
of listeners outside the U.S. I thought this would be worth sharing.

GEM: Part 2 Interview with Darby Hinton of Daniel Boone Fame In our last episode #60
we got to spend some time with Darby Hinton who was a child star back in the 1960s,
and for six of those years he played Isreal the son of Daniel Boone played by Fess
Parker in the hit TV series Daniel Boone.

In part 2 of my interview with Darby and his wife Shan I get to share what I found
on the Hinton Family History.

I’ve got more genealogy podcasting for you over at the Family History: Genealogy
Made Easy
podcast. In Episode 21 I’m going to share a tool with you that will help
you navigate your genealogy research. It’s called the Genealogical Proof Standard,
or GPS. And my special guest on the show is Mark Tucker of the ThinkGenealogy blog
who has created a terrific visual map of the GPS.

About Genealogy Gems Podcast

Do you yearn to learn more about your family history, but just don’t know where
to start? Have you started, but need a genealogy research boost? In each weekly
30 minute show host Lisa Louise Cooke will guide you through the genealogy search
process in this easy to follow and entertaining podcast. The world of family history
is open to everyone, and climbing your family tree has never been easier, or more
rewarding! Learn how to use family tree software, locate genealogy records through
online searches, create a family tree chart, and get tips on free genealogy resources.

You’ll also be inspired by the stories of other researchers who share their family
history search – their experience, tips, and rewards. Whether you want to research
Irish genealogy or Virginia genealogy, whether you’re looking for free family history
tips or you need advice on the best genealogy sites this podcast will equip and
inspire you to achieve great success in a short amount of time. Isn’t it time to
claim your place in history?

About Steve Nickle

Steve Nickle, President of FamilyLink.com, comes to the company with more than 20
years of executive and management leadership. He spent the first half of his career
in financial services after earning a Financial Planning degree from BYU. The second
half of his career has been spent primarily as an executive in small and medium-sized
companies, including two Vice President roles at MyFamily.com – Vice President of
Global Content Acquisition and Electronic Production, and Vice President of Marketing.
Nickle also served on the advisory board of New England Historical and Genealogical
Society (NEHGS). He has been involved in the genealogy space for the past seven
years.

“I believe WorldVitalRecords.com is in a unique position to make a difference in
the world of genealogy because of its dedicated and passionate employees to its
unique perspective on how to partner with the rest of the genealogy community.”

Celebrate Women’s History Month

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Who are some of the women in your family tree? Can you name your great-grandmother on your father’s side? What about the great-great-aunt on your mother’s side? Do you know what they did each day, or what they thought about as they raised their children?

March is Women’s History Month, a time to celebrate the women in your life and in history. According to About.com, the purpose of Women’s History Month is to “increase consciousness and knowledge of women’s history: to take one month of the year to remember the contributions of notable and ordinary women.”

To celebrate this occasion in your own home and increase awareness of some of your female ancestors, here are a few ideas:

1. With your family, trace the history of one of your female ancestor’s life on a map.
Here is  an example of this activity as outlined for the life of Anne Frank, a famous young woman in history.

Follow the timeline of famous dates in US women’s history and find the era in which one of your female ancestor’s lived. Read about what was happening in the lives of women when she was growing up.

3. Gather together the pictures, journal entries, newspaper clippings, pedigree charts, and other historical information on one of the women in your family tree and post this collection in your home on a bulletin board or on a family website where your family and friends can learn more about this woman who has contributed to your family.

Visit WorldVitalRecords.com’s New Online Store

Saturday, March 21st, 2009

WorldVitalRecords.com recently launched its online store with more
than 3,300 genealogical products! Finding the perfect product is easy. You can search
by ethnicity, locality, product type, publisher, record type, and genealogy essentials,
to name a few! The WorldVitalRecords.com Store also offers gift certificates.

Some of the books you can find at the WorldVitalRecords.com Store include: Kinship,
In Search of Your German Roots, Roots for Kids, Polish Roots, Finding Italian Roots,
Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry, The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, Evidence
Explained, Evidence! Early American Handwriting, American Passenger Arrival Records,

and much more!

This week’s top 5 bestsellers include:

Google Your Family Tree : Unlock the Hidden Power of Google by Dan Lynch,

International Vital Records Handbook. New 4th Edition
by Thomas Jay Kemp,

A New Genealogical Atlas of Ireland. Second Edition
by Brian Mitchell,

Finding Italian Roots. Second Edition by John Philip Colletta, and
Getting Started in Genealogy ONLINE
by William Dollarhide.

To access the store, go to: http://store.worldvitalrecords.com/home.php
or go to

WorldVitalRecords.com and click on Store.

New GPC Content from England, Ireland, US, and Wales

Friday, March 20th, 2009

The Major Collection this week at WorldVitalRecords.com contains a wide variety
of new databases from Genealogical Publishing Company. The databases include directories,
trees, histories, vital records, court records, and guides from England, Ireland,
the United States (Maryland, Massachusetts and Maine, New York, North Carolina,
Virginia) and Wales.


Special Report On Surnames in Ireland

Sir Robert E. Matheson. (1901, 1909). These two works-in-one are a valuable instrument
for tracing Irish family origins. The first, the Special Report, shows the areas
in Ireland with which family names are most frequently associated. In fact, it has
a 39-page table listing of about 2,400 surnames, alphabetically arranged, indicating
the number of occurrences of each surname in the various provinces and counties
of Ireland. Varieties and Synonymes of Surnames, the second report, consists of
a 32-page list of 2,091 names and their variations as well as a separate key to
the Registers’ Districts and Unions in which the surnames are located.


Massachusetts and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis (1885-1966)

Walter Goodwin Davis. (1916-1963). Reprinted in these three volumes are seventeen
books that comprise one of the major achievements of twentieth-century genealogy–the
multi-ancestor compendium plus Thomas Haley of Winter Harbor and His Descendants,
1930) compiled and published by Walter Goodwin Davis between 1916 and 1963. These
2,100 fully-indexed pages authoritatively cover 180 families, all of Davis’s colonial
forebears plus nineteen English families in the immediate ancestry of American immigrants.
One hundred fourteen of these families lived mostly in Massachusetts; twenty-nine
are associated largely with Maine; and eighteen–Basford, Brown, Clifford, Cram,
Estow, Fernald, Folsom, Gibbons, Gilman, Marston, Moses, Roberts, Roper, Sherburne,
Sloper, Taprill, Walton, and Waterhouse–lived largely in New Hampshire, primarily
Hampton, Portsmouth, or Exeter. Most of the 114 Massachusetts families resided in
Essex County, a few in Middlesex or Plymouth counties, or in Boston. Thus Massachusetts
and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis is largely a compendium
on “north of Boston” families.

The Davis opus is undoubtedly the premier work for northern New England, and an
often essential companion volume to the celebrated Genealogical Dictionary of Maine
and New Hampshire, which it considerably expands, especially for many Essex County
families with ties further north)–and the greatest multi-ancestor series to date
in American genealogy. Almost anyone with considerable New England ancestry–and
as many as 100 million living Americans, about 40 percent of the population, have
some colonial New England forebears–will descend from one or more, often a dozen
or more, of the 180 families herein. For this reprint edition, the 180 families
in all sixteen books have been arranged into a single alphabetical sequence, and
tables of contents identify the book in which the family originally appeared.


Records of Old Macon County, North Carolina, 1829-1850

Barbara Sears McRae. (1991). “Old” Macon County, North Carolina at one time included
all the land from the Blue Ridge on the east to the state boundaries of South Carolina,
Georgia, and Tennessee. In 1820, a survey party mapped the new territory, which
remained part of Haywood County until 1828, the year Macon County was established.
At the outset, “Old” Macon County included all or part of the present-day western
North Carolina counties of Macon, Jackson, Swain, Transylvania, Cherokee, Clay,
and Graham, and it would serve as a stop on the trail leading west for migrants
from the adjoining areas of North Carolina, the South Carolina upstate, and parts
of Georgia and Tennessee.

For this original Clearfield book, Barbara Sears McRae has abstracted Macon County
Deed Books A-E (1829-1850) to yield an accounting of the county’s earliest settlers.
Each abstract typically identifies the buyer and seller of the land, the date of
the transaction, the location of the land transferred, and the names of witnesses.
Ms. McRae also provides an index to over 4,000 persons named in the records, a separate
index to slave transactions, and an index to places. All in all, a beautifully executed
work destined to be regarded as the starting point for Macon County genealogical
research.


Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry. Volume 2

Marston Watson. (2004). Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson, declared among some in her seventeenth-century
world as a religious “heretic,” defied many of the most powerful men in the Massachusetts
Bay Colony, including Governor Thomas Dudley, in defense of her strong beliefs.
She endured a “trial by fire,” without benefit of a jury of her peers, in a highly
charged court where these men challenged and mocked her views on religion. Her banishment
from Salem and Boston drove her to a new colony called Rhode Island, which her mentor
and friend Roger Williams co-founded.

Thousands of Americans can claim the Marbury family’s lineal connections to their
royal and noble ancestry, from William the Conqueror through Edward I. These ancestors
include John, King of England, who signed the Magna Carta in 1215 at Runnymede,
as well as many of the barons who witnessed his signature on that famous document.
All later kinds of Spain, Holy Roman and Austrian emperors, most later English and
French kinds, all kings of Prussia and Russian czars, beginning with Alexander I,
are distant cousins as well.

This volume is the second in a projected multi-volume series dealing with Americans
of royal and noble ancestry. Taking the colonial period as a point of departure,
it focuses on two of Reverend Francis Marbury’s daughters, Anne and Katherine, who
immigrated with their husbands to the New World in the 1630s. It covers the first
five generations of their descendants, carrying the various lines up to and beyond
the Revolutionary War, into the sixth generation. The generational layout of the
work follows a modified format of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register,
with citations for all five generations based exclusively on vital records and approved
family histories.

The book concludes with an every-name index of several thousand entries and a comprehensive
bibliography. In addition, the author appended a “Lineage Society Index” with names
of eligible ancestors in a number of hereditary societies, including the Colonial
Clergy, Colonial Governors, Mayflower Descendants, and Revolutionary War Patriots.


Landholders of Northeastern New York, 1739-1802

Fred Q. Bowman. (1983). This work forms a directory of all participants in all land
sales and mortgage agreements in northeastern New York between 1739 and 1802. The
area covered includes all land within the present-day counties of Clinton, Essex,
Franklin, Warren, and Washington.

The first part identifies original grantees, persons awarded land in the area between
1739 and 1775, and provided is the date of award, name of grant, present town of
grant’s location, acreage, and grantee’s name. The second part, and by far the largest,
identifies about 9,000 landholders–grantees, grantors, mortgagees and mortgagors–whose
land records were filed between 1772 and 1802 in the deed and mortgage books of
Washington, Clinton, or Essex counties. In the various entries will be found the
names of all persons engaged in land transactions, the date of the transaction,
the place of residence of each of the principals, and the volume and page of the
original source book.

An appendix furnishes the dates of organization of all of the towns formed in northeastern
New York prior to 1803 and the population of these towns as of 1790 and 1800, and
it lists by counties the numbers of deeds and mortgages filed in this region between
1772 and 1802.


Ages from Court Records, 1636-1700: Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts

Melinde Lutz Sanborn. (2003) From thousands of court cases in Essex, Middlesex,
and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts, dating from 1636 to 1700, Melinde Sanborn has
extracted the names of all deponents and witnesses whose ages are given in the court
records of those counties. Depositions provided in early court records are among
the richest sources of personal information surviving from New England’s first century,
and Ms. Sanborn argues that “so many people in early New England were deponents
for one reason or another that no biography or genealogy can be complete without
a search through court records to see if a pertinent deposition exists.”

For this early period, the single most useful bit of evidence included in the depositions
is the age of the deponent. While most depositions vary in quality from being virtually
useless to providing corroboration of marriages, wills, and deeds, ages alone provide
incontrovertible value to the genealogist. Sometimes the age of a deponent was very
important to a particular case. Men over sixty, for example, were often brought
into court to support the claims of the ancient boundaries of litigants’ property.
Likewise, many older women who were experienced midwives were called upon to offer
opinions on the timeliness of a birth in a fornication case.

Also, one of the most common errors in genealogical work is confusing two or more
individuals of the same name. If senior or junior or tertius is not used, it is
very difficult to assign events to the correct individual. Frequently, fathers and
sons with the same given name came to court together, but with stated ages they
are easily differentiated. Men with the same name and of the same generation can
be another problem, but again a deposition with a specific age given can make all
the difference.

With this index–which lists the names and ages of 11,000 deponents, and the year
and source of the court records–researchers can quickly determine whether it is
worthwhile to track down the original court record.

Maryland and Virginia Colonials: Genealogies of Some Colonial Families
Volume 1 and
Volume 2

Sharon J. Doliante. (1991). Here is a true giant of a work, covering in full some
twenty-two colonial Maryland and Virginia families and also treating hundreds of
collateral families. Mrs. Doliante not only establishes the Virginia and Maryland
ancestry of the twenty-two main families, but also corrects many longstanding inaccuracies
and dispels some cherished myths, many repeated uncritically in one publication
after another, such as the non-existent fourth wife of Henry Ridgley, the erroneous
ancestry of Richard Duckett, Sr., and the putative maternity of the Sprigg children.

The physical specifications of the book are in themselves impressive. There are
over 1,200 pages of text, more than 150 illustrations, a bibliography, a place name
index, and an index of personal names with over 23,500 entries! In addition to the
standard sources both in print and manuscript, the author has had recourse to a
wide range of private and public records to substantiate her facts. Hence the book
is amply furnished with transcriptions of such records as wills, inventories, and
Bible records. Little will be found wanting here, and for those who are interested
in these families, from their origins in Maryland or Virginia up to recent times,
it is gratifying to know that someone has spared them the drudgery of sifting through
thousands of pages of court records.


Records of Old Macon County, North Carolina, 1829-1850

Barbara Sears McRae. (1991). “Old” Macon County, North Carolina at one time included
all the land from the Blue Ridge on the east to the state boundaries of South Carolina,
Georgia, and Tennessee. In 1820, a survey party mapped the new territory, which
remained part of Haywood County until 1828, the year Macon County was established.
At the outset, “Old” Macon County included all or part of the present-day western
North Carolina counties of Macon, Jackson, Swain, Transylvania, Cherokee, Clay,
and Graham, and it would serve as a stop on the trail leading west for migrants
from the adjoining areas of North Carolina, the South Carolina upstate, and parts
of Georgia and Tennessee.

For this original Clearfield book, Barbara Sears McRae has abstracted Macon County
Deed Books A-E (1829-1850) to yield an accounting of the county’s earliest settlers.
Each abstract typically identifies the buyer and seller of the land, the date of
the transaction, the location of the land transferred, and the names of witnesses.
Ms. McRae also provides an index to over 4,000 persons named in the records, a separate
index to slave transactions, and an index to places. All in all, a beautifully executed
work destined to be regarded as the starting point for Macon County genealogical
research.


Lewis of Warner Hall: History of a Family
(Free for 10 Days!)

Merrow E. Sorley. The Lewis family of Warner Hall, York County, Va. probably descends
from Robert Lewis of Brecon, Wales who came to Virginia in 1635. This book traces
his descendants in the male and female lines, and descents from other early Virginia
families. The bulk of this work is concerned with Col. John Lewis and Francis Fielding
and their descendants, Col. Charles Lewis and Mary Howell and their descendants,
and Col. Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether and their descendants, with much attention
given to these related families: Ambler, Ball, Barret, Bowles, Bushrod, Byrd, Carter,
Cobbs, Crawford, Eppes, Fauntleroy, Fielding, Griffin, Howell, Isham, Jefferson,
Kennon, Marshall, Piersey, Ragland, Randolph, Taliaferro, Taylor, Thompson, Walker,
Washington, Willis, Woodson, and Worsham.


Record Offices–How to Find Them

Since the redrawing of county boundaries in 1974 there has been a wholesale change
in the location of record offices in England and Wales. There are now many new county
record offices, new archive departments (even certain divisions of the Public Record
Office in London have changed location), and many consolidated and reconstituted
diocesan record offices. This guide is designed to help you locate these record
offices, and it contains maps to guide you to them. It also has addresses, phone
numbers, a list of relevant publications, and a variety of information pertaining
to each of the record offices in England and Wales. In this Ninth Edition the outstandingly
important relocations are in Central London. The closure of the historic Public
Record Office building in Chancery Lane (with transfer of all original records to
Kew) and the relocation of General Registry Office records of births, marriages
and deaths has brought into being the Family Records Centre, with its holdings of
G.R.O. indexes, microfilmed census records, and P.C.C. wills.


Landholders of Northeastern New York, 1739-1802

This work forms a directory of all participants in all land sales and mortgage agreements
in northeastern New York between 1739 and 1802. The area covered includes all land
within the present-day counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Warren, and Washington.

The first part identifies original grantees, persons awarded land in the area between
1739 and 1775, and provided is the date of award, name of grant, present town of
grant’s location, acreage, and grantee’s name. The second part, and by far the largest,
identifies about 9,000 landholders–grantees, grantors, mortgagees and mortgagors–whose
land records were filed between 1772 and 1802 in the deed and mortgage books of
Washington, Clinton, or Essex counties. In the various entries will be found the
names of all persons engaged in land transactions, the date of the transaction,
the place of residence of each of the principals, and the volume and page of the
original source book.

An appendix furnishes the dates of organization of all of the towns formed in northeastern
New York prior to 1803 and the population of these towns as of 1790 and 1800, and
it lists by counties the numbers of deeds and mortgages filed in this region between
1772 and 1802.


Genealogical & Local History Books in Print: General Reference & World Resources
Volume: Fifth Edition

The General Reference and World Resources Volume lists genealogical books in print
that fit into the categories of general reference or world resources, and the book
is arranged under those two principal classifications. Therein, under headings ranging
from adoption, Bible records, and bibliography to textbooks, vital records, and
westward migration, the General Reference section lists thousands of genealogical
books in print; while the World Resources section lists publications covering countries
throughout the world, from Australia, Britain, and Germany to Italy, Switzerland,
and the West Indies.

Alphabetically arranged by authors’ names or the names of sponsoring institutions,
the entries, typically, give the name of the author, the full title of the work,
date of publication, whether indexed or illustrated, in cloth or paper, number of
pages, selling price, and vendor number (publisher, bookseller, etc.). Vendors are
listed separately in the front of the book, both numerically and alphabetically,
with addresses and special ordering information given to enable the reader to place
orders. In addition, for maximum convenience in your research, the book contains
an index of authors and an index of titles. An easier or better method of locating
books can hardly be imagined!


Pocahontas, Alias Matoaka

Wyndham Robertson. This work is the precursor to the new, consolidated volume on
Pocahontas above. Chiefly a tabulation of names, although many dates of birth, marriage
and death are given, this work traces the descendants of Pocahontas and John Rolfe
through seven generations. Names covered include Alfriend, Archer, Bentley, Bernard,
Bland, Bolling, Branch, Cabell, Catlett, Cary, Dandridge, Dixon, Douglas, Duval,
Eldridge, Ellett, Ferguson, Field, Fleming, Gay, Gordon, Griffon, Grayson, Harrison,
Hubard, Lewis, Logan, Markham, Meade, McRae, Murray, Page, Poythress, Randolph,
Robertson, Skipwith, Stanard, Tazewell, Walke, West, and Whittle.


Side Lights of Maryland History: The Davis Family and Coat of Arms

Hester Dorsey Richardson. (1913). This landmark of Maryland genealogy consists of
a large number of meticulously researched articles which were designed, in part,
to counter the “scurrilous” claim that Maryland was settled largely by convicts
and indentured servants. It is as a compilation of family histories and source records
that the work shines, however, for it is the embodiment of the very best in genealogical
orthodoxy.

Volume I contains seventy-five chapters, or articles, on a variety of subjects,
among them articles on the passengers on the Ark and the Dove, the first Maryland
settlers, muster rolls of colonial militia, original members of the Society of the
Cincinnati in Maryland, the names of 1,000 early settlers in Maryland with their
land surveys, Scotch exiles in Maryland, etc. Volume II consists entirely of genealogical
sketches which carry over 100 Maryland families back to the immigrant ancestor.

Armorial General: Two Volumes-
Volume 2
and
Volume 3

The Armorial General series, described hereunder, is a multi-volume work on the
coats of arms of the world; it is both monumental and without equal, and is the
most exhaustive undertaking of its kind. Needless to say, the volumes are in French,
but the information is stereotyped, and easily understood.

The Armorial General is the most authoritative work on the coats of arms in the
world. The descriptions of the arms cover those of more than 100,000 families, alphabetically
arranged and accurately described. The work was compiled from hundreds of armorials
and it contains an extensive glossary of terms. In addition to a full description
of the arms, most entries identify the nationality of the arms bearer, his title,
and the date his title was conferred. The basic text was established with the publication
of the second edition, corrected and enlarged, of 1884-1887. In 1950 a reprint was
published in a limited edition of 250 copies, with a new Preface and new Additions
and Corrections. The present reprint is an exact reproduction of this 1950 edition.
It is the best edition available and the first to appear in America.

“. . . it should be in any library with a reference collection of any size, and
in any genealogy and heraldry and museum library.” –Library Journal (July 1965).

Answers to a Few Questions About We’re Related

Monday, March 16th, 2009

Privacy Policy, Removing Persons From Trees, Connecting Families, and Spending Money on We’re Related

The feature article this week is somewhat of a smorgasbord of questions and comments we have received about our We’re Related application this past week. The first section talks about the Privacy Policy at We’re Related. The second section deals with removing individuals from your family tree. The third section discusses how everyone, including baby boomers can use We’re Related to connect with their families. The fourth section pertains to spending money on We’re Related versus WorldVitalRecords.com. Here we go…

1. What is the privacy policy at We’re Related on Facebook?

Over this past week we have received several questions regarding the privacy policy at We’re Related. We recognize that some individuals are reluctant to post content to their tree because they do not want it to be viewed by everyone who is their friend on Facebook. At We’re Related we have been sensitive to these kinds of issues. If you are using We’re Related, you determine who your relatives are and who can
see the content you have uploaded to your tree. We’re Related’s privacy policy can be found at the following address:

http://apps.facebook.com/we_r_related/?page=privacy_policy

2. How do I remove a person’s name from my family tree on We’re Related?

To remove a person’s name from the family tree on We’re Related, first you need to get them into a box with an edit button in the top, right-hand corner. If they are not already listed in a box, click on the individual’s name to put them in the box where you are working. Next, click on the edit button in the top, right-hand corner of the box. This will pull up a box where you can edit the individual’s information. There is a red delete button near the bottom.

3. Can everyone, including Baby Boomers, really use We’re Related to connect with their family?

The following comment was made by Bruce Christensen regarding We’re Related and
connecting families.

At 55, and with an empty nest, we have found that the social media has really blessed our lives. When our youngest left, we longed for the fun banter and conversation that had permeated our home for over 30-years. These electronic networks full of pictures and conversation have increased the memories and make us proud to be at this point in our life. We have even used some of our creativity to contribute to the conversation and assist others to connect in a meaningful way. Great tools like We’re Related and other family applications will continue to grow the ranks of Facebook with Baby Boomers like us.

To view the entire article on this topic at Paul Allen’s blog,
click here
.

4. Why does FamilyLink.com put money into We’re Related instead of WorldVitalRecords.com?
Recently we announced that FamilyLink.com received 2.85 million in Series B funding. As a result of this email, there has been some concern that FamilyLink.com is focusing more on We’re Related on Facebook than on WorldVitalRecords.com.

Here are some thoughts from CEO, Paul Allen:

  1. We aren’t putting money into social networking–it is putting profits into the company.
  2. We are using these profits to launch GenSeek and improve WorldVitalRecords.com.
  3. We have many more Major Collections coming soon from current and new content partners.
  4. We are recruiting a Chief Genealogist and a product manager to help us improve WorldVitalRecords.com even more.

“We want all our subscribers to feel appreciated and listened to because without them and their feedback we won’t get this right. With their help, we’ll create something wonderful!” – Paul Allen, CEO, FamilyLink.com, Inc.

New Feature at WorldVitalRecords.com: Searching by Date Field

Friday, March 13th, 2009

WorldVitalRecords.com recently added a new feature that allows individuals to search by date field. This feature is listed on all advanced search boxes, as well as the search box listed on the home page of WorldVitalRecords.com and is titled: year. This box is located directly under the Place search box and to the left of the Matching Type box.

How does it work?
This feature is easy to use. Simply type in any date that was an important date pertaining to the individual for whom you are searching. For example, it could be a birth date, death date, marriage date, etc. Suppose I was searching for an individual with the surname Brandon who died in 1920. I would type, Brandon into the Family Name search box and 2006 in the Year search box and click Search. 701 matches in 32 databases for Brandon (1920) appear on the screen. I would then need to browse through the databases for the information I needed.

For what databases can I use the Search by Date/Year feature?
This new search feature enhances date searching a great deal for the data sets at WorldVitalRecords.com that include date fields. Some databases, such as newspapers, do not included date fields, and will not necessarily return results for that year (unless the rest of the information you type matches and will bring up results).

New Birth, Marriage, and Death Records and Maps From the UK

Thursday, March 12th, 2009

The major collection this week includes fourteen United Kingdom databases from Anguline Research Archives. Eleven of the fourteen databases include birth, marriage, and death records. The remaining two databases contain maps from Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire.

Seventeenth Century Parish Register Transcripts Belonging to the Peculiar of Southbell (Available 3/5/2009)

Transcripts of various seventeenth century parish registers of twenty-four of the parishes which belong to the Peculiar of Southwell, Nottinghamshire. These transcripts were written on strips of parchment tied in one bundle and kept in the monument room at Southwell. They are obviously the remaining members of a much larger series of documents. Some of the transcripts are of an earlier time than the extant parish registers of the particular parish. Complete with indexes of names and places.

Morris & Co.’s Commercial Directory and Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne and District,
1874
(Available 3/5/2009)

The entry for each of the places (Cheshire, Derbyshire, and Lancashire) includes a description, directory of clergy, gentry & private residents, alphabetical trades & professions directory, classified trades directory (for larger towns), post office & public information.

Leicestershire Maps (Available 3/5/2009)

A selection of 25 Ordnance Survey maps from the northern tip of Leicestershire and Southeast Nottinghamshire. The scale of the maps is six inches to the mile. These maps were surveyed between 1900 & 1920 and may contain revisions up to 1950. Includes a map of all of Leicestershire engraved by John Cary, published in 1805 showing the boundaries of the Hundreds of Leicestershire. Villages included: Ab Kettlby, Alverton, Aslockton, Old Dalby, Elton, Belvoir Castle, Bingham, Bottesford, Branston, Broughton, Colson Bassett, Croxton Park, Cropwell Bishop, Eaton, Elton, Eston, Flawborough, Harby, Hickling, Hose, Keyworth, Kilvington, Kinoulton, Knipton, Langar, Long Claswon, Normanton, Nether Broughton, Orston, Plungar, Redmile (part), Saltby, Scalford, Sproxton, Staunton in the Vale, Stanton on the Wolds, Stathern, Stonesby, Tythby, Waltham on the Wolds, Wartnaby, Wiverton Hall, Whatton, plus others.

The Free Grammar School of Queen Elizabeth in Horncastle (Free for ten days! - Available 3/6/2009)

This history of Wakefield Grammar School covers the first three hundred years of the school from its foundation in 1591. It includes the Statutes, Governors, Head Masters, Scholarships, and Register of Pupils. Complete with indexes of subjects, places, and persons.

The Register of all the Christenings, Marriages and Burials in the Parish of St.
Mary, Chislet in the County of Kent, 1538-1767
(Available 3/6/2009)

In the Parliamentary Returns of the answers respecting Parish Registers, made in the eleventh year of George IV, and ordered to be printed 14 February 1834,

The following books of Registers are described as then existing at Chistlet:  No. I, Baptisms 1562–1656; Burials 1562–1647; Marriages 1562–1645; Nos. II-IV, Baptisms and Burials, 1653–1765, Marriages 1653–1659, 1662, 1667, 1702, 1707, 1753; Nos. V, VI. Baptisms and Burials 1766–1812; and Nos. VII, VIII. Marriages 1754–1812.

Register of Pitchford (Available 3/6/2009)

Transcripts of the parish registers for the parish of Pitchford in Shropshire.  Covers the period 1558–1812. Complete with indexes of names and places.

Nottinghamshire Maps (Available 3/6/2009)

A selection of nineteen Ordnance Survey maps mainly of Nottinghamshire.

The scale of the maps is six inches to the mile. These maps were surveyed between 1900 and 1920 and may contain revisions up to 1950. Includes:  Nottingham, Colwick, Holme Pierrepoint, Burton Joyce,  Shelford, Stoke Bardolph, North Nottingham, Old Basford,  Arnold, Lambley, Calverton, Woodborough, Hucknall  Torkard, Greatworth, Helmond, Stuchbury, Thorpe Langton, Weston by Welland, Sutton Bassett, Ashley, Drayton, Medbourne, Bescaby, Asfordby, Saxelby, Welby, South Kilworth, Welford, Denton, Woolsthorpe, Goadby Marwood, Upper Broughton, Waltham Station, and Saltby.

The Parish Registers of Hove and Preston, 1538-1812 (Available 3/9/2009)

Transcripts of the parish registers for the parish of Hove in Sussex, and also for the parish of Preston in Sussex. These two parishes were united for 350 years, and only separated again on the resignation of the Vicar in 1878.

The Story of the Ancient Parochial Chapelry of S. Mary’s, Oldham (Available 3/9/2009)

This edition was printed at Oldham in 1906 by W. E. Clegg. Includes the history of the ancient chapel and chapelry, the fabric, the ornaments, vestments and furniture, the clergy, the register, and the church wardens.

The Register of Smethcote (Available 3/9/2009)

Transcripts of the parish registers for the parish of Smethcote, Shropshire.

Covers the period 1612–1812. Complete with indexes of places and names.

The Parish Registers of Crofton, York County, 1615-1812 (Available 3/10/2009)

Transcribed and edited by William Townsend. Transcripts of the parish registers for the parish of Crofton, Yorkshire. Complete with indexes of places and names.

The Handy Book of Parish Law (Available 3/11/2009)

A popular and practical statement of the most important portions of parochial law—that great system of local self-government which is the foundation of English freedom.

Written by W. A. Holdsworth. New and revised edition, published in 1886. Includes 35 chapters on many subjects including:  the parish church, constables, highways, sanitation, rates, poor law etc. A useful reference guide for local historians, genealogists, and students of law.

The Derby School Register, 1570-1901 (Available 3/11/2009)

This register of Derby School covers the years 1570–1901. In addition to the biographical details about the scholars it contains lists of prizewinners for the various years. There is also an index of names of pupils, and lists of masters and headmasters of the school.

The Registers of the Parish Church of Allerton Mauleverer County, York (Available 3/11/2009)

Covering the period 1557–1812. Complete with indexes of places and names. Transcribed by F. William Slingsby. Published in 1908.

Family Treasures

Tuesday, March 10th, 2009

By Whitney McGowan, FamilyLink.com, Inc.

I have kept many of the gifts my grandparents have given me. For example, my paternal grandma loves antiques and has collected many roomfuls of treasures. Occasionally when I go over to visit her, she will let me go through her antique jewelry and pick something out. I treasure these valuables because my grandma gave them to me. I also have many treasures from my Grammie (my mom’s mom). She has written me many beautiful, heartfelt letters. She has also sewn my name on towels, crocheted dish towels for me, and has given me the recipes for many of my favorite foods and desserts that she makes. When I look at the jewelry, or the towels, or even read through some of the letters I remember some of the memories I have shared with my grandmothers.

I think I am not unique in having sentiments in this area. For example here are a few excerpts, in their own words, from others who shared their thoughts on owning simple treasures from their loved ones:

When my grandfather passed away I told my mother I wanted just one treasure from my grandparents’ estate: the Toas-Tite sandwich maker. I’m sure I was the only grandchild to make this request. Out of the chaos of sorting through half a century of my grandparents’ belongings, my mother eventually unearthed my inheritance. On that day I became a rich man.  Almost sixteen inches long, with a round four-and-three-quarter-inch sandwich holder at the end, this kitchen collectible was the well-spring of hundreds of perfectly circular grilled cheese sandwiches made by my grandmother in her Cedar Rapids, Iowa, home. Manufactured sometime in the 1940s by Bar-B-Bun, Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, the Toas-Tite has two black wooden handles held together with a metal loop on the end to keep them closed and, well, tight. The face of an almost hysterically smiling woman adorned the cover of the manufacturer’s original box. Next to the happy chef was the sales pitch: “Make a luscious sealed in hot drip prof (sic) toasted sandwich.” Prof, stood for “proof” I imagine, and “hot drips” meant lots of saturated fat. The beauty behind Toas-Tite’s unique design was the ability to make grilled cheese sandwiches, toast, and hamburgers over an outdoor campfire or, in my case, over a gas flame in Grandmother’s kitchen. …No, the treasures my grandparents passed on to me are more valuable than shares of stock and acres of land. For how do you inventory gardens, food, family, and the love of simple pleasures? Inheriting these qualities will take the rest of my life and there is no guarantee that I will succeed. No wonder that the first time I used the Toas-Tite I burned the grilled cheese sandwiches. Just as I feared — it’s not easy as it looks. – Stephen Lyons, http://www.austinmama.com/lettersfrommidlifenine.htm

What do I really treasure? Many people often paid my grandparents with silver dollars. You don’t see that any more, it’s too inconvenient to carry those big pieces of metal now. Of course you didn’t need to carry near as many of them in those days. Silver dollars are a special memory to me for another reason: they were grandma and grandpa’s savings. They put aside the silver dollars that came into the shop to purchase special things. They also used these silver dollars to give to their grandchildren on their birthdays. I still have a couple of those old silver dollars they gave me. No, they are not collector’s pieces, they are not worth a whole lot more than a dollar to anyone else, but to me they hold memories and are priceless. – http://www.heartlight.org/articles/200806/20080603_treasure.html

What heirlooms or family treasures have value in your life? Preserving these treasures can help you remember your loved ones and the times you shared with them. If you have heirlooms or special family treasures from one of your loved ones whom you never met, try learning more about them on WorldVitalRecords.com, a treasure-trove of information.

New GPC Content From Connecticut, Kentucky, Maine, New York, Virginia, and Wales.

Friday, March 6th, 2009

This week’s major collection includes birth, marriage, and death records, stories and histories, and census and voter lists from Genealogical Publishing Company. The content for these ten new databases is from Connecticut, Kentucky, Maine, New York, Virginia, and Wales.

View all recently added databases.

Calendar of Wills, 1626-1836– online 2/26/09
This sought-after volume contains abstracts of 2,162 wills, giving the name of the testator, place of residence, date, names of wife and children, legatees, names of executors and witnesses, and the number of the will. Arranged in rough alphabetical order and thereunder approximately chronologically, this work identifies some 15,000 persons from the wills filed, which were filed from all around New York State. The complete name index at the back of the book further enhances its usefulness. Fernow’s introduction, consisting of an explanation of New York testamentary law, is another outstanding feature of this collection of the earliest wills on record for New York State.

Electoral Registers Since 1832; and Burgess Rolls– online 2/26/2009
Published annually since 1832, electoral registers list the names and addresses of everyone entitled to vote, noting the qualifications which brought each voter onto the register, such as current residence or ownership of property. During most of the 19th century the printed registers were arranged in alphabetical order by constituency, while later they were arranged in street order by parish. Thus they are used widely by genealogists as a tool to locate individuals in the various decennial censuses. Until now there has never been a guide showing just where these amazingly informative lists can be consulted, but this present work redresses that problem and provides a county-by-county inventory of published electoral registers held in libraries and record offices throughout Britain.

Adventures of Purse and Person, Volume 3-– online 2/27/2009
This third volume of the fourth edition of Adventurers of Purse and Person is a culmination of the author’s twenty-five year association with the Order of First Families of Virginia. It is the final volume of a project with the purpose to identify the descendants of the earliest settlers of the colony and those who as members of the Virginia Company financed the venture on new shores. The investigations by many students of colonial Virginia genealogy have made possible the inclusion of this information, and their contributions, frequently noted in the footnote citations, have enhanced the accounts presented herein.

The Founding Families of Virginia refers to approximately 150 individuals who can be identified as (1) Adventurers of Purse (i.e. stockholders in the Virginia Company of London) who either came to Virginia in the period 1607–1625 and had descendants or who did not come to Virginia within that period but whose grandchildren were residents there; or (2) Adventurers of Person, 1607–1625 (i.e. immigrants to Virginia) who left descendants.

Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales, Volume 1– online 2/27/2009 and
Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales, Volume 2- online 3/2/2009
First published in 1872, with a second edition in 1875, Nicholas’s Annals and Antiquities of the County Families of Wales is still the standard work on Welsh family history and the chief source of genealogical data on the counties and families of the principality. Unlike other books on the subject, it combines histories of the ancient counties of Wales with family lineages, integrating the two to show the social and genealogical evolution of the country. Again unlike other works, it is based on the author’s personal investigation of county records and family papers, producing in the end what can only be described as the most complete and faithful compendium of Welsh family history ever published.

In this work, then, we are entrusted with a reliable record of ancient and modern families as well as—to paraphrase the subtitle—a reliable record of all ranks of the gentry, their lineages, appointments, armorial ensigns, and residences; ancient pedigrees and memorials of old and extinct families; notices of the family history and antiquities of each county; and rolls of high sheriffs and other county officials. So little is available on the subject that the reprint of this famous work will be a godsend to Americans of Welsh descent.

Cavaliers and Pioneers. Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Volume 1-– online 3/2/2009
This is one of the most outstanding records of early emigrants to Virginia. It records under the name of the patentee or grantee, the earliest Virginia land grants and patents from 1623 to 1666, giving the number of acres, locations and dates of settlement, and names of family members, and it further provides references to marriages, wills, and other legal instruments. It also has the names of some thousands who were transported or brought over by the early settlers as “headrights.” The index contains the names of about 20,000 persons.

Early Families of Eastern and Southeastern Kentucky and Their Descendants-– online 3/3/2009
This massive compilation contains genealogies of the early families of eastern and southeastern Kentucky, the section originally comprised of the counties of Floyd, Knox, Greenup, and Clay. The genealogies refer to approximately 12,000 individuals, many of them worked through seven generations. The main families, many of them of Scotch-Irish descent, are listed alphabetically starting with the progenitor of the Kentucky line and continue chronologically thereafter according to the succession of children. Data furnished on each of the descendants generally includes name, date of birth, marriage and death, place of residence, incidental facts pertaining to military and public service, references to public records, and so on.

Cape Cod Library of Local History and Genealogy, Volume – online 3/3/2009 and
Cape Cod Library of Local History and Genealogy, Volume 2-– online 3/4/2009It is well known that Cape Cod families are difficult to trace. Only the probate records survived the burning of the Barnstable County Courthouse in 1827, and similar disasters have taken their toll on the Cape’s town records. Many of Chatham’s records, for instance, were lost in a fire, and Yarmouth’s records of the Revolutionary War period have been missing for years. Even so, many important Cape Cod town records still exist: the problem is that so few of them are in print. So it was fortuitous when Col. Leonard Smith stumbled upon a series of pamphlets published at Yarmouthport by Charles W. Swift in the early part of the 20th century under the name Cape Cod Library of History and Genealogy. A series of 108 pamphlets!

Although contributors to the Cape Cod Library included such celebrated genealogists as Josiah Paine (author of History of Harwich), William C. Smith (known for his History of Chatham), and Amos Otis (Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families), the series never reached a large audience, and is today virtually inaccessible. No library in the country holds the complete collection of 108 pamphlets. With great diligence, Col. Smith put together a complete collection for himself, arranged the pamphlets in the order in which they were published, and then, to make the material usable, compiled an index of names. In just over 2,000 pages he has managed to put together a reference work that compensates for the chronic shortage of printed Cape Cod source material, and it is available now in this splendid two-volume consolidation. See for yourself. The contents are listed below.

Volume 1: Cape Cod Byways; The Descendants of John Jenkins; Plymouth Trading Corporation; Summer Street-Hawes Lane, Yarmouthport; The Baker Zone in West Dennis; Cape Cod Land Titles; Permissive Use of the Common Lands of Proprietary Plantations; “Cast-Up” Lands; The Prince-Howes Court Cupboard; The Cape Type of House; Shipbuilding at East Dennis; The Nye House at Sandwich; History of Sandwich Glass and the Deming Jarves Book of Designs; Description of the Farris Windmill in South Yarmouth; William Swift and Descendants to the Sixth Generation; Old Shipmasters; Church Councils; Homer; The South Dennis Meeting House; Old Indian Meeting House at Mashpee; The Revolutionary War Service of Nathan Crosby; The Revolutionary War Service of Ansel Taylor; The Oldest Public Library Building in the U.S.; The Geological Formation of Cape Cod; Fast Runs of Clipper Ships; The Romance of a Barnstable Bell; Glass-Making in Sandwich; Thomas Foster of Weymouth and His Descendants; The Robbins Family of Cape Cod; Bangs Family Papers; Puddington-Purrington-Purinton; Thomas Howes of Yarmouth, Mass., and Some of His Descendants, Together with the Rev. John Mayo, Allied to Him by Marriage; Early Settlers of Eastham, Book 2; Early Settlers of Eastham, Book 1; Nicholas Snow of Eastham and Some of His Descendants, Together with Samuel Storrs, Thomas Huckins, Elder John Chipman, and Isaac Wells, Allied to the Snows by Marriage; Edward Kenwrick, the Ancestor of the Kenricks or Kendricks of Barnstable County and Nova Scotia and His Descendants; Early Chatham Settlers; Stephen and Giles Hopkins, Mayflower Passengers, and Some of Their Descendants, Including an Eldridge Line; Old Quaker Village, South Yarmouth, Massachusetts; West Yarmouth Houses Seventy-Five Years Ago, from Parker’s River Westward; A Mayflower Line; Hopkins-Snow-Cook; Atwood Genealogy; Newcombe Genealogy; Early Wheldens of Yarmouth; Descendants of William Hedge of Yarmouth; Thomas Clarke, the Pilgrim, and His Descendants; Burgess; The Yarmouth Families of Eldredge; Richard Taylor, Tailor, and Some of His Descendants; The Cross Families of Truro and Wellfleet; The Mayo Family of Truro; Deacon John Doane and the Doane Family; A Brief Sketch of the Life of George Webb, A Cape Cod Captain in the Revolutionary War; Genealogical Sketch of Descendants of Jeremiah Howes of Dennis, Mass.; The Lumbert or Lombard Family; Eastham and Orleans Historical Papers; Richard Rich of Dover Neck; John Robinson of Leyden and His Descendants to the Sixth Generation; The Yarmouth Family of Gray; and The Yarmouth Family of Chase.

Families of Early Milford, Connecticut– online 3/4/2009
This monumental compilation contains the genealogical records of approximately 300 families of early Milford, Connecticut. The genealogies range from a single paragraph to a dozen pages or more, enumerating descents through several generations, and are arranged alphabetically by family name, under which may also be found the names and records of allied families. The families traced here include those called Free Planters, who settled Milford in 1639, those who came soon afterward and who are called After Planters, and, in addition, those families who were in town at an early date and about whom there is a significant amount of information available. There are nearly 15,000 names in the index.

FamilyLink.com, Inc. Announces New Lead Developer

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

Founder of GenForum, GenCircles, and Family Tree Legends to help connect families on FamilyLink.com
PROVO, UT, March 2, 2009 – Cliff Shaw, founder and developer of numerous genealogy companies and products, recently joined FamilyLink.com, Inc. as its new lead developer.

“FamilyLink is charting new territory in family social networking and it’s exciting to be on the leading edge of this. The growth the company is experiencing, even in a down market, is truly remarkable,” said Cliff Shaw, lead developer, FamilyLink.com, Inc. “It’s great to work with such an unbelievably well-rounded team.  Paul Allen and I have done great things in the industry working apart. I can’t wait to see what our merged teams can do together.”

“One of my major goals at FamilyLink.com is to assemble the right people to build a great company,” said Paul Allen, CEO, FamilyLink.com, Inc. “Cliff Shaw is a talented addition to our team who definitely knows the ins and outs of how to best connect families.”

As lead developer, Shaw will work toward helping the company become the global leader in family social networking on all social networks and mobile platforms. The FamilyLink.com, Inc. network of sites became one of the Top 500 Web companies in the world in December 2008, based on Quantcast statistics. Currently the network ranks No. 165 based on total monthly unique visitors, making the company one of the fastest growing Web properties in the world.

“Families are connecting in new ways thanks to social networks. With the increasing distance between family members, online and mobile communication has become a vital way for many families to stay connected. FamilyLink is on the leading edge of this trend and will help families stay closer,” Shaw said.

Shaw is an entrepreneur who has founded a number of companies in the past 13 years, both in and out of genealogy. At 18, he started GenForum and quickly grew it into the largest family history community on the Internet. GenForum was a top 200 site with more than 75 million monthly page views and remains a popular destination. GenForum was sold to the Learning Company in 1998. In 2000, Shaw founded GenCircles, a user-contributed family tree site that introduced SmartMatching, the first technology that automatically linked users’ family trees. GenCircles grew to become the No. 2 family tree contribution site on the Internet with hundreds of millions of names in trees. In 2001, Shaw founded Pearl Street Software and led the development of Family Tree Legends, the No. 2 family tree software package in worldwide sales. Family Tree Legends received consistent critical acclaim and sold at most major retail outlets in the United States and UK. MyHeritage.com acquired Pearl Street Software in 2006 and makes significant use of the SmartMatching technology to this day.

Shaw lives in Boulder, Colorado with his wife and is an avid environmentalist and world traveler.

About FamilyLink.com, Inc.
FamilyLink.com, Inc. is the leading social networking company for families globally.
It was formed in 2006 by original founding executives of Ancestry.com and MyFamily.com.
The company operates several genealogy web sites and has popular applications on
Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, Hi5, and Friendster. The company’s We’re Related application
is currently the third most popular application on Facebook and has helped users
define nearly 200 million family relationships. FamilyLink.com, Inc. also operates
the AdMazing ad network that represents more than 200 million monthly impressions
on high traffic family history and heritage sites. Genealogy partners include Everton,
brightsolid, Statute of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Genealogical Publishing
Company, FindAGrave.com, Godfrey Memorial Library, and FamilySearch.

Media Contact
Whitney Ransom McGowan
Corporate Communications Director
FamilyLink.com, Inc.

http://corporate.familylink.com

whitney@familylink.com
(801) 377-0588