Archive for the ‘Genealogical.com’ Category

New GPC Content From Wales, Germany, and the United States

Thursday, May 14th, 2009


By Whitney McGowan, FamilyLink.com, Inc.

This week’s major collection at WorldVitalRecords.com includes new databases from Wales, Germany, and the United States (Virginia, and Maryland). The content comes from Genealogical Publishing Company and includes directories, a family history, and family tree data. Schlegel’s American Families of German Ancestry (available 5/11/2009) is free for ten days.

The Surnames of Wales (available 5/7/2009)

The purpose of this database is to provide the reader with detailed insight into the origins and occurrence of common Welsh surnames, together with some consideration of those surnames which are associated with particular locales, thus helping to suggest a likely place of origin within Wales. The opening chapters of the book give an historical overview of Welsh names, dealing, in particular, with the patronymic naming system and the gradual adoption of surnames. The central chapters include a comprehensive survey of Welsh surnames and an all-important glossary of surnames. This is the core of the work, as it provides the origins and history of surnames from the viewpoint of family history, and also shows the distribution and incidence of surnames throughout Wales. The final chapters cover such items as the distribution of surnames derived from the ap prefix, the incidence of surnames derived from Old Testament names, and surname evidence for the presence of people of Welsh origin in populations outside Wales. Nearly forty maps, drawn by the authors, show the incidence and distribution of typical surnames throughout Wales.

Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5. Fourth Edition. Volume One, Families A-F (available 5/8/2009)

This is the fourth edition of the most celebrated compendium of family histories in the entire field of Virginia genealogy. Prepared under the auspices of the Order of First Families of Virginia, 1607-1624/5 in anticipation of the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown, and edited by the foremost authority on Virginia genealogy, John Frederick Dorman, this new edition extends the lines of descent of the founding families of Virginia from four generations to six, bringing most families down to the Revolutionary or early Federal periods.

The purpose of the book is to establish descents–through the sixth generation–of the approximately 150 individuals who can be identified as (1) Adventurers of Purse (i.e. stockholders in the Virginia Company of London) who either came to Virginia in the period 1607-1625 and had descendants or who did not come to Virginia within that period but whose grandchildren were residents there; or (2) Adventurers of Person, 1607-1625 (i.e. immigrants to Virginia) who left descendants. With roots deeply embedded in the social fabric of the United States, descendants of these original settlers today number in the hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, and like descendants of the Mayflower passengers, they claim an ancestry that is unique in American history.

The foundation for this work is the famous “Muster” of January-February 1624/25– essentially a census taken by the Royal Commission which succeeded the Virginia Company to determine the extent and composition of the Jamestown settlements. In the Muster (which is reproduced in entirety here in Volume One), the name of each colonist appears with the location of his home and the number in his family, together with information about his stock of food, his supply of arms and ammunition, his boats, houses, and livestock. In all, about 1,200 persons are named in the Muster, of whom approximately 150 are shown here to have left descendants to the sixth generation. Most scholars agree that the total population of Jamestown between 1607 and 1625 was about 7,000, so by 1624/5 only about one-seventh of the colonists had survived the punishing conditions of the Virginia wilderness.

In addition to the Muster, this work builds on the investigations of dozens of scholars, correcting, revising, and supplementing the best genealogical scholarship of the past half century. New discoveries, newly available information, and a further reevaluation of evidence concerning previously accepted relationships have led, in some instances, to wholesale changes in the accepted genealogies. In consequence, this fourth edition brings together the results of all the most recent scholarship on these families, expand.


Schlegel’s American Families of German Ancestry, Volume 1
(available 5/11/2009)
Free for Ten Days!

This is a reprint of the largest collection of German-American genealogies ever published, a full-blown compendium of family history and biography unknown to all but a handful of specialists. The first three volumes were published somewhat inopportunely between 1916 and 1918, with a fourth volume added in 1926. Each volume was limited to 200 numbered and registered copies, and consequently only a dozen or so three-volume sets can be located today, while the fourth volume is all but unknown. This is a complete paradox, for like similar compendia by Virkus and McKenzie, this work should be available to all students of genealogy and should be the very first resource for anyone researching German-American ancestry.

Unlike other great compendia, however, Schlegel doesn’t just start out with the immigrant ancestor; rather, each family history usually begins two or three generations back, examining the family in its historic setting before bringing it forward to the immigrant ancestor and his descendants in America. Averaging about ten pages in length, including portraits and coats of arms, the family histories are no mere catalogues of births, marriages, and deaths but are rich biographical and genealogical studies, each depicting the education, service, achievements, life, and career of the various family members, and each tracing the roots of the first four or five generations in America, usually commencing in the 18th or the 19th century, naming thousands of related family members.

Of all the information-rich sources of German-American ancestry, none is this comprehensive or as useful to the researcher, as illustrated by its coverage of the following families:

Ackermann, Aichmann, Altenbrand, Ammann, Auer, Barkhausen, Bauer, Baumann, Becker, Bender, Bermel, Biertuempfel, Boos, Bossert, Brandis, Braunstein, Breidt, Broking, Burger, Cordts, Cronau, Dangler, Dannenhoffer, de Kalb, Deck, Dippel, Dittenhoefer, Dochtermann, Dornhoefer, Doscher, Draesel, Dreier, Dressel, Drewes, Dreyer, Eichacker, Eichhorn, Eimer, Engelhardt, Espenscheid, Faber, Faller, Fink, Fischer, Flammer, Focht-Vogt, Frank, Frey, Fritz, Froeb, Funk, Gaus, Gobel, Goebel, Goepel, Golsner, Grell, Gretsch, Groborsch, Gunther, Hauenstein, Haug, Haupt, Haussling, Havemeyer, Hechtenberg, Hecker, Helwig, Hering, Herkimer, Herlich, Herrmann, Hoecker, Hoffmann, Jaeckle, Jahn, Janson, Junge, Just, Katz, Keene, Kern, Kessler, Kiefer, Kircher, Kirsch, Kleinert, Kline, Kny, Kobbe, Kochersberger, Koelble, Komitsch, Korth, Kost, Koster, Kraemer, Kramer, Kroeger, Kuhn, Lafrentz, Lamprecht, Lausecker, Leisler, Lexow, Liebmann, Limbacher, Lohse, Lotz, Luckhardt, Luhrsen, Lutz, Marquardt, Martin, Maulbeck, Maurer, Meeker, Mehlin, Mende, Meurer, Meyer, Mielke, Mietz, Moeller, Moser, Mueller, Muhlenberg, Muller, Naeher, Nissen, Nungesser, Oberglock, Offermann, Otto, Pedersen, Peter, Pflug, Poppenhusen, Prahl, Rasch, Rath, Reichhelm, Reisinger, Reppenhagen, Reuter, Ridder, Riedman, Ries, Ringler, Roehr, Runkel, Ruoff, Sauerwein, Schaeffer, Schalck, Schering, Scherrer, Schieren, Schill, Schilling, Schissel, Schlegel, Schlitz, Schmelzer, Schmidt, Schmieder, Schneider, Scholzel, Schortau, Schrader,Schroeder,  Schultz, Schumann, Schurz, Schwarz, Sebold, Seyfarth, Sigel, Solms, Specht, Spengler, Stabler, Steiger, Steil, Steingut, Steinway, Stemme, Stengel, Steubner, Steurer, Stiefel, Stier, Stohn, Strebel, Stuber, Stutz, Stutzmann, Sutro, Thumann, Vogeler, Vollweiler, vom Hofe, von Bernuth, von Briesen, von Steuben, Wahlers, Weber, Weimar, Weismann, Weitling, Wendel, Wenk, Wesel, Wilhelms, Wintjen, Wischmann, Wolffram, Zaabel, Zechiel, and Zobel


Maryland and Virginia Colonials: Genealogies of Some Colonial Families, Volume 1
(available 5/12/2009) and
Maryland and Virginia Colonials: Genealogies of Some Colonial Families, Volume 2
(available 5/13/2009)

Here is a true giant of a work, covering in full some twenty-two colonial Maryland and Virginia families and also treating hundreds of collateral families. Mrs. Doliante not only establishes the Virginia and Maryland ancestry of the twenty-two main families, but also corrects many longstanding inaccuracies and dispels some cherished myths, many repeated uncritically in one publication after another, such as the non-existent fourth wife of Henry Ridgley, the erroneous ancestry of Richard Duckett, Sr., and the putative maternity of the Sprigg children.

The physical specifications of the book are in themselves impressive. There are over 1,200 pages of text, more than 150 illustrations, a bibliography, a place-name index, and an index of personal names with over 23,500 entries! In addition to the standard sources both in print and manuscript, the author has had recourse to a wide range of private and public records to substantiate her facts. Hence the book is amply furnished with transcriptions of such records as wills, inventories, and Bible records. Little will be found wanting here, and for those who are interested in these families, from their origins in Maryland or Virginia up to recent times, it is gratifying to know that someone has spared them the drudgery of sifting through thousands of pages of court records.

New Genealogical Publishing Content Covering North Carolina, New York, and Virginia

Thursday, April 30th, 2009

By Whitney McGowan, FamilyLink.com, Inc.

This week’s Major Collection includes new content from Virginia, North Carolina, and New York ranging from 1635–1851. The content comes from Genealogical Publishing Company and includes a family history, vital records, court records, and a directory. One of the databases, Marriages of Bertie County, North Carolina, 1762–1868, is free for ten days.

Lewis of Warner Hall: History of a Family (available 4/23/09)

The Lewis family of Warner Hall, York County, Virginia probably descends from Robert Lewis of Brecon, Wales who came to Virginia in 1635. This book traces his descendants in the male and female lines, and descents from other early Virginia families. The bulk of this work is concerned with Col. John Lewis and Francis Fielding and their descendants, Col. Charles Lewis and Mary Howell and their descendants, and Col. Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether and their descendants, with much attention given to these related families: Ambler, Ball, Barret, Bowles, Bushrod, Byrd, Carter, Cobbs, Crawford, Eppes, Fauntleroy, Fielding, Griffin, Howell, Isham, Jefferson, Kennon, Marshall, Piersey, Ragland, Randolph, Taliaferro, Taylor, Thompson, Walker, Washington, Willis, Woodson, and Worsham.

Marriages of Bertie County, North Carolina, 1762–1868 (available 4/24/09) Free for Ten Days!

This work contains abstracts of all marriage bonds issued in Bertie County between 1762 and 1868. (Bonds dating from 1722, when the county was formed, are no longer extant.) The marriage records abstracted here are based on microfilm copies of the original bonds and on a microfilm copy of a register of marriages maintained from 1851 by the Register of Deeds at Windsor, the county seat. As is customary, the data is arranged throughout by the surname of the groom, and each entry provides the name of the bride, the date of the marriage bond or (after 1851) marriage license, and the names of clergymen, witnesses, and bondsmen. The name index at the back of the volume provides easy access to brides, witnesses, and bondsmen specified in the bonds. This work is an important contribution to North Carolina genealogy.

Marriages of Rutherford County, North Carolina, 1779–1868 (available 4/27/09)

This work has abstracts of all marriage bonds issued in Rutherford County from 1779 to 1868, when marriage bonds—as prerequisite for marriage—were discontinued. These records were abstracted, in the main, from a microfilm copy of the original marriage bonds on file at the State Archives in Raleigh—a few directly from bonds and licenses in the county courthouse in Rutherfordton—and they refer to some 12,500 persons, including bondsmen. The arrangement is alphabetical by the name of the groom, and each entry includes the name of the bride, the date of the bond, the name of the bondsman and, from 1851, the date of the actual marriage.

Landholders of Northeastern New York, 1739–1802 (available 4/28/09)

This work forms a directory of all participants in all land sales and mortgage agreements in northeastern New York between 1739 and 1802. The area covered includes all land within the present-day counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Warren, and Washington.

The first part identifies original grantees, persons awarded land in the area between 1739 and 1775, and provided is the date of award, name of grant, present town of grant’s location, acreage, and grantee’s name. The second part, and by far the largest, identifies about 9,000 landholders—grantees, grantors, mortgagees and mortgagors—whose land records were filed between 1772 and 1802 in the deed and mortgage books of Washington, Clinton, or Essex counties. In the various entries will be found the names of all persons engaged in land transactions, the date of the transaction, the place of residence of each of the principals, and the volume and page of the original source book.

An appendix furnishes the dates of organization of all of the towns formed in northeastern New York prior to 1803 and the population of these towns as of 1790 and 1800, and it lists by counties the numbers of deeds and mortgages filed in this region between 1772 and 1802.

Lists of Inhabitants of Colonial New York (available 4/29/09)

O’Callaghan’s Documentary History of the State of New-York, a four-volume work published 1849–1851, was strong in genealogical records of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. But this fine work was hard to use for it had no name index.

This present work has all of the genealogical records in the O’Callaghan work, but it adds a complete index of names. Prepared by Roseanne Conway, the index lists about 12,000 inhabitants of colonial New York–Dutch, English, and German.

The following is a representative selection of lists of inhabitants in the work: Male Inhabitants of Ulster County, 1689; Army List, 1700; Census of the Counties of Orange, Dutchess, and Albany, 1702, 1714, 1720; Census of the City of New York, 1703; Inhabitants of Hempstead, 1673; Inhabitants of Flushing, Southampton, and Southold, 1698; Long Island Rate Lists, 1675, 1676, 1683; Census of King’s County, 1698; King’s County Militia, 1715; the Palatines, 1710–1714; Inhabitants of New Rochelle (1710) and East Chester; Freeholders in Ulster County, 1728; Lists of Quakers and Moravians, 1755–1756; Miscellaneous Lists, 1738; and Inhabitants of Gloucester County, 1771.

New GPC Content from England, Ireland, US, and Wales

Friday, March 20th, 2009

The Major Collection this week at WorldVitalRecords.com contains a wide variety
of new databases from Genealogical Publishing Company. The databases include directories,
trees, histories, vital records, court records, and guides from England, Ireland,
the United States (Maryland, Massachusetts and Maine, New York, North Carolina,
Virginia) and Wales.


Special Report On Surnames in Ireland

Sir Robert E. Matheson. (1901, 1909). These two works-in-one are a valuable instrument
for tracing Irish family origins. The first, the Special Report, shows the areas
in Ireland with which family names are most frequently associated. In fact, it has
a 39-page table listing of about 2,400 surnames, alphabetically arranged, indicating
the number of occurrences of each surname in the various provinces and counties
of Ireland. Varieties and Synonymes of Surnames, the second report, consists of
a 32-page list of 2,091 names and their variations as well as a separate key to
the Registers’ Districts and Unions in which the surnames are located.


Massachusetts and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis (1885-1966)

Walter Goodwin Davis. (1916-1963). Reprinted in these three volumes are seventeen
books that comprise one of the major achievements of twentieth-century genealogy–the
multi-ancestor compendium plus Thomas Haley of Winter Harbor and His Descendants,
1930) compiled and published by Walter Goodwin Davis between 1916 and 1963. These
2,100 fully-indexed pages authoritatively cover 180 families, all of Davis’s colonial
forebears plus nineteen English families in the immediate ancestry of American immigrants.
One hundred fourteen of these families lived mostly in Massachusetts; twenty-nine
are associated largely with Maine; and eighteen–Basford, Brown, Clifford, Cram,
Estow, Fernald, Folsom, Gibbons, Gilman, Marston, Moses, Roberts, Roper, Sherburne,
Sloper, Taprill, Walton, and Waterhouse–lived largely in New Hampshire, primarily
Hampton, Portsmouth, or Exeter. Most of the 114 Massachusetts families resided in
Essex County, a few in Middlesex or Plymouth counties, or in Boston. Thus Massachusetts
and Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis is largely a compendium
on “north of Boston” families.

The Davis opus is undoubtedly the premier work for northern New England, and an
often essential companion volume to the celebrated Genealogical Dictionary of Maine
and New Hampshire, which it considerably expands, especially for many Essex County
families with ties further north)–and the greatest multi-ancestor series to date
in American genealogy. Almost anyone with considerable New England ancestry–and
as many as 100 million living Americans, about 40 percent of the population, have
some colonial New England forebears–will descend from one or more, often a dozen
or more, of the 180 families herein. For this reprint edition, the 180 families
in all sixteen books have been arranged into a single alphabetical sequence, and
tables of contents identify the book in which the family originally appeared.


Records of Old Macon County, North Carolina, 1829-1850

Barbara Sears McRae. (1991). “Old” Macon County, North Carolina at one time included
all the land from the Blue Ridge on the east to the state boundaries of South Carolina,
Georgia, and Tennessee. In 1820, a survey party mapped the new territory, which
remained part of Haywood County until 1828, the year Macon County was established.
At the outset, “Old” Macon County included all or part of the present-day western
North Carolina counties of Macon, Jackson, Swain, Transylvania, Cherokee, Clay,
and Graham, and it would serve as a stop on the trail leading west for migrants
from the adjoining areas of North Carolina, the South Carolina upstate, and parts
of Georgia and Tennessee.

For this original Clearfield book, Barbara Sears McRae has abstracted Macon County
Deed Books A-E (1829-1850) to yield an accounting of the county’s earliest settlers.
Each abstract typically identifies the buyer and seller of the land, the date of
the transaction, the location of the land transferred, and the names of witnesses.
Ms. McRae also provides an index to over 4,000 persons named in the records, a separate
index to slave transactions, and an index to places. All in all, a beautifully executed
work destined to be regarded as the starting point for Macon County genealogical
research.


Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry. Volume 2

Marston Watson. (2004). Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson, declared among some in her seventeenth-century
world as a religious “heretic,” defied many of the most powerful men in the Massachusetts
Bay Colony, including Governor Thomas Dudley, in defense of her strong beliefs.
She endured a “trial by fire,” without benefit of a jury of her peers, in a highly
charged court where these men challenged and mocked her views on religion. Her banishment
from Salem and Boston drove her to a new colony called Rhode Island, which her mentor
and friend Roger Williams co-founded.

Thousands of Americans can claim the Marbury family’s lineal connections to their
royal and noble ancestry, from William the Conqueror through Edward I. These ancestors
include John, King of England, who signed the Magna Carta in 1215 at Runnymede,
as well as many of the barons who witnessed his signature on that famous document.
All later kinds of Spain, Holy Roman and Austrian emperors, most later English and
French kinds, all kings of Prussia and Russian czars, beginning with Alexander I,
are distant cousins as well.

This volume is the second in a projected multi-volume series dealing with Americans
of royal and noble ancestry. Taking the colonial period as a point of departure,
it focuses on two of Reverend Francis Marbury’s daughters, Anne and Katherine, who
immigrated with their husbands to the New World in the 1630s. It covers the first
five generations of their descendants, carrying the various lines up to and beyond
the Revolutionary War, into the sixth generation. The generational layout of the
work follows a modified format of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register,
with citations for all five generations based exclusively on vital records and approved
family histories.

The book concludes with an every-name index of several thousand entries and a comprehensive
bibliography. In addition, the author appended a “Lineage Society Index” with names
of eligible ancestors in a number of hereditary societies, including the Colonial
Clergy, Colonial Governors, Mayflower Descendants, and Revolutionary War Patriots.


Landholders of Northeastern New York, 1739-1802

Fred Q. Bowman. (1983). This work forms a directory of all participants in all land
sales and mortgage agreements in northeastern New York between 1739 and 1802. The
area covered includes all land within the present-day counties of Clinton, Essex,
Franklin, Warren, and Washington.

The first part identifies original grantees, persons awarded land in the area between
1739 and 1775, and provided is the date of award, name of grant, present town of
grant’s location, acreage, and grantee’s name. The second part, and by far the largest,
identifies about 9,000 landholders–grantees, grantors, mortgagees and mortgagors–whose
land records were filed between 1772 and 1802 in the deed and mortgage books of
Washington, Clinton, or Essex counties. In the various entries will be found the
names of all persons engaged in land transactions, the date of the transaction,
the place of residence of each of the principals, and the volume and page of the
original source book.

An appendix furnishes the dates of organization of all of the towns formed in northeastern
New York prior to 1803 and the population of these towns as of 1790 and 1800, and
it lists by counties the numbers of deeds and mortgages filed in this region between
1772 and 1802.


Ages from Court Records, 1636-1700: Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts

Melinde Lutz Sanborn. (2003) From thousands of court cases in Essex, Middlesex,
and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts, dating from 1636 to 1700, Melinde Sanborn has
extracted the names of all deponents and witnesses whose ages are given in the court
records of those counties. Depositions provided in early court records are among
the richest sources of personal information surviving from New England’s first century,
and Ms. Sanborn argues that “so many people in early New England were deponents
for one reason or another that no biography or genealogy can be complete without
a search through court records to see if a pertinent deposition exists.”

For this early period, the single most useful bit of evidence included in the depositions
is the age of the deponent. While most depositions vary in quality from being virtually
useless to providing corroboration of marriages, wills, and deeds, ages alone provide
incontrovertible value to the genealogist. Sometimes the age of a deponent was very
important to a particular case. Men over sixty, for example, were often brought
into court to support the claims of the ancient boundaries of litigants’ property.
Likewise, many older women who were experienced midwives were called upon to offer
opinions on the timeliness of a birth in a fornication case.

Also, one of the most common errors in genealogical work is confusing two or more
individuals of the same name. If senior or junior or tertius is not used, it is
very difficult to assign events to the correct individual. Frequently, fathers and
sons with the same given name came to court together, but with stated ages they
are easily differentiated. Men with the same name and of the same generation can
be another problem, but again a deposition with a specific age given can make all
the difference.

With this index–which lists the names and ages of 11,000 deponents, and the year
and source of the court records–researchers can quickly determine whether it is
worthwhile to track down the original court record.

Maryland and Virginia Colonials: Genealogies of Some Colonial Families
Volume 1 and
Volume 2

Sharon J. Doliante. (1991). Here is a true giant of a work, covering in full some
twenty-two colonial Maryland and Virginia families and also treating hundreds of
collateral families. Mrs. Doliante not only establishes the Virginia and Maryland
ancestry of the twenty-two main families, but also corrects many longstanding inaccuracies
and dispels some cherished myths, many repeated uncritically in one publication
after another, such as the non-existent fourth wife of Henry Ridgley, the erroneous
ancestry of Richard Duckett, Sr., and the putative maternity of the Sprigg children.

The physical specifications of the book are in themselves impressive. There are
over 1,200 pages of text, more than 150 illustrations, a bibliography, a place name
index, and an index of personal names with over 23,500 entries! In addition to the
standard sources both in print and manuscript, the author has had recourse to a
wide range of private and public records to substantiate her facts. Hence the book
is amply furnished with transcriptions of such records as wills, inventories, and
Bible records. Little will be found wanting here, and for those who are interested
in these families, from their origins in Maryland or Virginia up to recent times,
it is gratifying to know that someone has spared them the drudgery of sifting through
thousands of pages of court records.


Records of Old Macon County, North Carolina, 1829-1850

Barbara Sears McRae. (1991). “Old” Macon County, North Carolina at one time included
all the land from the Blue Ridge on the east to the state boundaries of South Carolina,
Georgia, and Tennessee. In 1820, a survey party mapped the new territory, which
remained part of Haywood County until 1828, the year Macon County was established.
At the outset, “Old” Macon County included all or part of the present-day western
North Carolina counties of Macon, Jackson, Swain, Transylvania, Cherokee, Clay,
and Graham, and it would serve as a stop on the trail leading west for migrants
from the adjoining areas of North Carolina, the South Carolina upstate, and parts
of Georgia and Tennessee.

For this original Clearfield book, Barbara Sears McRae has abstracted Macon County
Deed Books A-E (1829-1850) to yield an accounting of the county’s earliest settlers.
Each abstract typically identifies the buyer and seller of the land, the date of
the transaction, the location of the land transferred, and the names of witnesses.
Ms. McRae also provides an index to over 4,000 persons named in the records, a separate
index to slave transactions, and an index to places. All in all, a beautifully executed
work destined to be regarded as the starting point for Macon County genealogical
research.


Lewis of Warner Hall: History of a Family
(Free for 10 Days!)

Merrow E. Sorley. The Lewis family of Warner Hall, York County, Va. probably descends
from Robert Lewis of Brecon, Wales who came to Virginia in 1635. This book traces
his descendants in the male and female lines, and descents from other early Virginia
families. The bulk of this work is concerned with Col. John Lewis and Francis Fielding
and their descendants, Col. Charles Lewis and Mary Howell and their descendants,
and Col. Robert Lewis and Jane Meriwether and their descendants, with much attention
given to these related families: Ambler, Ball, Barret, Bowles, Bushrod, Byrd, Carter,
Cobbs, Crawford, Eppes, Fauntleroy, Fielding, Griffin, Howell, Isham, Jefferson,
Kennon, Marshall, Piersey, Ragland, Randolph, Taliaferro, Taylor, Thompson, Walker,
Washington, Willis, Woodson, and Worsham.


Record Offices–How to Find Them

Since the redrawing of county boundaries in 1974 there has been a wholesale change
in the location of record offices in England and Wales. There are now many new county
record offices, new archive departments (even certain divisions of the Public Record
Office in London have changed location), and many consolidated and reconstituted
diocesan record offices. This guide is designed to help you locate these record
offices, and it contains maps to guide you to them. It also has addresses, phone
numbers, a list of relevant publications, and a variety of information pertaining
to each of the record offices in England and Wales. In this Ninth Edition the outstandingly
important relocations are in Central London. The closure of the historic Public
Record Office building in Chancery Lane (with transfer of all original records to
Kew) and the relocation of General Registry Office records of births, marriages
and deaths has brought into being the Family Records Centre, with its holdings of
G.R.O. indexes, microfilmed census records, and P.C.C. wills.


Landholders of Northeastern New York, 1739-1802

This work forms a directory of all participants in all land sales and mortgage agreements
in northeastern New York between 1739 and 1802. The area covered includes all land
within the present-day counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Warren, and Washington.

The first part identifies original grantees, persons awarded land in the area between
1739 and 1775, and provided is the date of award, name of grant, present town of
grant’s location, acreage, and grantee’s name. The second part, and by far the largest,
identifies about 9,000 landholders–grantees, grantors, mortgagees and mortgagors–whose
land records were filed between 1772 and 1802 in the deed and mortgage books of
Washington, Clinton, or Essex counties. In the various entries will be found the
names of all persons engaged in land transactions, the date of the transaction,
the place of residence of each of the principals, and the volume and page of the
original source book.

An appendix furnishes the dates of organization of all of the towns formed in northeastern
New York prior to 1803 and the population of these towns as of 1790 and 1800, and
it lists by counties the numbers of deeds and mortgages filed in this region between
1772 and 1802.


Genealogical & Local History Books in Print: General Reference & World Resources
Volume: Fifth Edition

The General Reference and World Resources Volume lists genealogical books in print
that fit into the categories of general reference or world resources, and the book
is arranged under those two principal classifications. Therein, under headings ranging
from adoption, Bible records, and bibliography to textbooks, vital records, and
westward migration, the General Reference section lists thousands of genealogical
books in print; while the World Resources section lists publications covering countries
throughout the world, from Australia, Britain, and Germany to Italy, Switzerland,
and the West Indies.

Alphabetically arranged by authors’ names or the names of sponsoring institutions,
the entries, typically, give the name of the author, the full title of the work,
date of publication, whether indexed or illustrated, in cloth or paper, number of
pages, selling price, and vendor number (publisher, bookseller, etc.). Vendors are
listed separately in the front of the book, both numerically and alphabetically,
with addresses and special ordering information given to enable the reader to place
orders. In addition, for maximum convenience in your research, the book contains
an index of authors and an index of titles. An easier or better method of locating
books can hardly be imagined!


Pocahontas, Alias Matoaka

Wyndham Robertson. This work is the precursor to the new, consolidated volume on
Pocahontas above. Chiefly a tabulation of names, although many dates of birth, marriage
and death are given, this work traces the descendants of Pocahontas and John Rolfe
through seven generations. Names covered include Alfriend, Archer, Bentley, Bernard,
Bland, Bolling, Branch, Cabell, Catlett, Cary, Dandridge, Dixon, Douglas, Duval,
Eldridge, Ellett, Ferguson, Field, Fleming, Gay, Gordon, Griffon, Grayson, Harrison,
Hubard, Lewis, Logan, Markham, Meade, McRae, Murray, Page, Poythress, Randolph,
Robertson, Skipwith, Stanard, Tazewell, Walke, West, and Whittle.


Side Lights of Maryland History: The Davis Family and Coat of Arms

Hester Dorsey Richardson. (1913). This landmark of Maryland genealogy consists of
a large number of meticulously researched articles which were designed, in part,
to counter the “scurrilous” claim that Maryland was settled largely by convicts
and indentured servants. It is as a compilation of family histories and source records
that the work shines, however, for it is the embodiment of the very best in genealogical
orthodoxy.

Volume I contains seventy-five chapters, or articles, on a variety of subjects,
among them articles on the passengers on the Ark and the Dove, the first Maryland
settlers, muster rolls of colonial militia, original members of the Society of the
Cincinnati in Maryland, the names of 1,000 early settlers in Maryland with their
land surveys, Scotch exiles in Maryland, etc. Volume II consists entirely of genealogical
sketches which carry over 100 Maryland families back to the immigrant ancestor.

Armorial General: Two Volumes-
Volume 2
and
Volume 3

The Armorial General series, described hereunder, is a multi-volume work on the
coats of arms of the world; it is both monumental and without equal, and is the
most exhaustive undertaking of its kind. Needless to say, the volumes are in French,
but the information is stereotyped, and easily understood.

The Armorial General is the most authoritative work on the coats of arms in the
world. The descriptions of the arms cover those of more than 100,000 families, alphabetically
arranged and accurately described. The work was compiled from hundreds of armorials
and it contains an extensive glossary of terms. In addition to a full description
of the arms, most entries identify the nationality of the arms bearer, his title,
and the date his title was conferred. The basic text was established with the publication
of the second edition, corrected and enlarged, of 1884-1887. In 1950 a reprint was
published in a limited edition of 250 copies, with a new Preface and new Additions
and Corrections. The present reprint is an exact reproduction of this 1950 edition.
It is the best edition available and the first to appear in America.

“. . . it should be in any library with a reference collection of any size, and
in any genealogy and heraldry and museum library.” –Library Journal (July 1965).

New GPC Content From Connecticut, Kentucky, Maine, New York, Virginia, and Wales.

Friday, March 6th, 2009

This week’s major collection includes birth, marriage, and death records, stories and histories, and census and voter lists from Genealogical Publishing Company. The content for these ten new databases is from Connecticut, Kentucky, Maine, New York, Virginia, and Wales.

View all recently added databases.

Calendar of Wills, 1626-1836– online 2/26/09
This sought-after volume contains abstracts of 2,162 wills, giving the name of the testator, place of residence, date, names of wife and children, legatees, names of executors and witnesses, and the number of the will. Arranged in rough alphabetical order and thereunder approximately chronologically, this work identifies some 15,000 persons from the wills filed, which were filed from all around New York State. The complete name index at the back of the book further enhances its usefulness. Fernow’s introduction, consisting of an explanation of New York testamentary law, is another outstanding feature of this collection of the earliest wills on record for New York State.

Electoral Registers Since 1832; and Burgess Rolls– online 2/26/2009
Published annually since 1832, electoral registers list the names and addresses of everyone entitled to vote, noting the qualifications which brought each voter onto the register, such as current residence or ownership of property. During most of the 19th century the printed registers were arranged in alphabetical order by constituency, while later they were arranged in street order by parish. Thus they are used widely by genealogists as a tool to locate individuals in the various decennial censuses. Until now there has never been a guide showing just where these amazingly informative lists can be consulted, but this present work redresses that problem and provides a county-by-county inventory of published electoral registers held in libraries and record offices throughout Britain.

Adventures of Purse and Person, Volume 3-– online 2/27/2009
This third volume of the fourth edition of Adventurers of Purse and Person is a culmination of the author’s twenty-five year association with the Order of First Families of Virginia. It is the final volume of a project with the purpose to identify the descendants of the earliest settlers of the colony and those who as members of the Virginia Company financed the venture on new shores. The investigations by many students of colonial Virginia genealogy have made possible the inclusion of this information, and their contributions, frequently noted in the footnote citations, have enhanced the accounts presented herein.

The Founding Families of Virginia refers to approximately 150 individuals who can be identified as (1) Adventurers of Purse (i.e. stockholders in the Virginia Company of London) who either came to Virginia in the period 1607–1625 and had descendants or who did not come to Virginia within that period but whose grandchildren were residents there; or (2) Adventurers of Person, 1607–1625 (i.e. immigrants to Virginia) who left descendants.

Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales, Volume 1– online 2/27/2009 and
Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales, Volume 2- online 3/2/2009
First published in 1872, with a second edition in 1875, Nicholas’s Annals and Antiquities of the County Families of Wales is still the standard work on Welsh family history and the chief source of genealogical data on the counties and families of the principality. Unlike other books on the subject, it combines histories of the ancient counties of Wales with family lineages, integrating the two to show the social and genealogical evolution of the country. Again unlike other works, it is based on the author’s personal investigation of county records and family papers, producing in the end what can only be described as the most complete and faithful compendium of Welsh family history ever published.

In this work, then, we are entrusted with a reliable record of ancient and modern families as well as—to paraphrase the subtitle—a reliable record of all ranks of the gentry, their lineages, appointments, armorial ensigns, and residences; ancient pedigrees and memorials of old and extinct families; notices of the family history and antiquities of each county; and rolls of high sheriffs and other county officials. So little is available on the subject that the reprint of this famous work will be a godsend to Americans of Welsh descent.

Cavaliers and Pioneers. Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Volume 1-– online 3/2/2009
This is one of the most outstanding records of early emigrants to Virginia. It records under the name of the patentee or grantee, the earliest Virginia land grants and patents from 1623 to 1666, giving the number of acres, locations and dates of settlement, and names of family members, and it further provides references to marriages, wills, and other legal instruments. It also has the names of some thousands who were transported or brought over by the early settlers as “headrights.” The index contains the names of about 20,000 persons.

Early Families of Eastern and Southeastern Kentucky and Their Descendants-– online 3/3/2009
This massive compilation contains genealogies of the early families of eastern and southeastern Kentucky, the section originally comprised of the counties of Floyd, Knox, Greenup, and Clay. The genealogies refer to approximately 12,000 individuals, many of them worked through seven generations. The main families, many of them of Scotch-Irish descent, are listed alphabetically starting with the progenitor of the Kentucky line and continue chronologically thereafter according to the succession of children. Data furnished on each of the descendants generally includes name, date of birth, marriage and death, place of residence, incidental facts pertaining to military and public service, references to public records, and so on.

Cape Cod Library of Local History and Genealogy, Volume – online 3/3/2009 and
Cape Cod Library of Local History and Genealogy, Volume 2-– online 3/4/2009It is well known that Cape Cod families are difficult to trace. Only the probate records survived the burning of the Barnstable County Courthouse in 1827, and similar disasters have taken their toll on the Cape’s town records. Many of Chatham’s records, for instance, were lost in a fire, and Yarmouth’s records of the Revolutionary War period have been missing for years. Even so, many important Cape Cod town records still exist: the problem is that so few of them are in print. So it was fortuitous when Col. Leonard Smith stumbled upon a series of pamphlets published at Yarmouthport by Charles W. Swift in the early part of the 20th century under the name Cape Cod Library of History and Genealogy. A series of 108 pamphlets!

Although contributors to the Cape Cod Library included such celebrated genealogists as Josiah Paine (author of History of Harwich), William C. Smith (known for his History of Chatham), and Amos Otis (Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families), the series never reached a large audience, and is today virtually inaccessible. No library in the country holds the complete collection of 108 pamphlets. With great diligence, Col. Smith put together a complete collection for himself, arranged the pamphlets in the order in which they were published, and then, to make the material usable, compiled an index of names. In just over 2,000 pages he has managed to put together a reference work that compensates for the chronic shortage of printed Cape Cod source material, and it is available now in this splendid two-volume consolidation. See for yourself. The contents are listed below.

Volume 1: Cape Cod Byways; The Descendants of John Jenkins; Plymouth Trading Corporation; Summer Street-Hawes Lane, Yarmouthport; The Baker Zone in West Dennis; Cape Cod Land Titles; Permissive Use of the Common Lands of Proprietary Plantations; “Cast-Up” Lands; The Prince-Howes Court Cupboard; The Cape Type of House; Shipbuilding at East Dennis; The Nye House at Sandwich; History of Sandwich Glass and the Deming Jarves Book of Designs; Description of the Farris Windmill in South Yarmouth; William Swift and Descendants to the Sixth Generation; Old Shipmasters; Church Councils; Homer; The South Dennis Meeting House; Old Indian Meeting House at Mashpee; The Revolutionary War Service of Nathan Crosby; The Revolutionary War Service of Ansel Taylor; The Oldest Public Library Building in the U.S.; The Geological Formation of Cape Cod; Fast Runs of Clipper Ships; The Romance of a Barnstable Bell; Glass-Making in Sandwich; Thomas Foster of Weymouth and His Descendants; The Robbins Family of Cape Cod; Bangs Family Papers; Puddington-Purrington-Purinton; Thomas Howes of Yarmouth, Mass., and Some of His Descendants, Together with the Rev. John Mayo, Allied to Him by Marriage; Early Settlers of Eastham, Book 2; Early Settlers of Eastham, Book 1; Nicholas Snow of Eastham and Some of His Descendants, Together with Samuel Storrs, Thomas Huckins, Elder John Chipman, and Isaac Wells, Allied to the Snows by Marriage; Edward Kenwrick, the Ancestor of the Kenricks or Kendricks of Barnstable County and Nova Scotia and His Descendants; Early Chatham Settlers; Stephen and Giles Hopkins, Mayflower Passengers, and Some of Their Descendants, Including an Eldridge Line; Old Quaker Village, South Yarmouth, Massachusetts; West Yarmouth Houses Seventy-Five Years Ago, from Parker’s River Westward; A Mayflower Line; Hopkins-Snow-Cook; Atwood Genealogy; Newcombe Genealogy; Early Wheldens of Yarmouth; Descendants of William Hedge of Yarmouth; Thomas Clarke, the Pilgrim, and His Descendants; Burgess; The Yarmouth Families of Eldredge; Richard Taylor, Tailor, and Some of His Descendants; The Cross Families of Truro and Wellfleet; The Mayo Family of Truro; Deacon John Doane and the Doane Family; A Brief Sketch of the Life of George Webb, A Cape Cod Captain in the Revolutionary War; Genealogical Sketch of Descendants of Jeremiah Howes of Dennis, Mass.; The Lumbert or Lombard Family; Eastham and Orleans Historical Papers; Richard Rich of Dover Neck; John Robinson of Leyden and His Descendants to the Sixth Generation; The Yarmouth Family of Gray; and The Yarmouth Family of Chase.

Families of Early Milford, Connecticut– online 3/4/2009
This monumental compilation contains the genealogical records of approximately 300 families of early Milford, Connecticut. The genealogies range from a single paragraph to a dozen pages or more, enumerating descents through several generations, and are arranged alphabetically by family name, under which may also be found the names and records of allied families. The families traced here include those called Free Planters, who settled Milford in 1639, those who came soon afterward and who are called After Planters, and, in addition, those families who were in town at an early date and about whom there is a significant amount of information available. There are nearly 15,000 names in the index.

New Birth, Marriage, and Death Records From Ireland, Maine, New Hampshire, Ohio Pennsylvania, and Virginia

Friday, February 27th, 2009

The major collection this week includes 10 new databases from Genealogical Publishing Company that feature birth, marriage, and death records along with stories and histories. Read descriptions of the databases below:
View all recently added databases.

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire-online 2/19/2009 (This database is FREE FOR 10 DAYS)

This indispensable and comprehensive reference work is offered in a convenient one-volume form. It contains extensive biographical and genealogical data on every family established in Maine and New Hampshire before 1699. Listed are the births, marriages, and deaths of the settlers through the third generation, and sometimes into the fourth. Entries may include data on places of origin, residences, wills and deeds, court cases, and highlights of lives and careers.

History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Volume 2, Part 1 - online 2/19/2009

Compiled and edited by Donald Lines Jacobus for the Eunice Dennie Burr chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1930 (Volume I) and 1932 (Volume II). It was originally published in Fairfield, Connecticut and reprinted in 1976 by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. of Baltimore with “Additions and Corrections” dating from 1943.

History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Volume 2, Part 2- – online 2/20/2009

Compiled and edited by Donald Lines Jacobus (1930-1932, 1943). Jacobus’s Families of Old Fairfield is the ultimate authority on the ancestry and relationships of approximately 50,000 residents of Fairfield County, Connecticut. It is a vast compendium of family history, meticulously developed from original sources, and is in every way an accurate reflection of the investigative genius of its celebrated author. As genealogies go, it is a perfect model. Each family history commences with the original 17th-century settler and is brought down, in most cases, to the early decades of the 19th century. The accumulated data is further enhanced by abstracts of land and probate records, the effect of which is to add still more weight to the already overwhelming evidence. Throughout, families are arranged in alphabetical order. Children are carried forward as heads of families in leap-frog fashion, and everyone mentioned whose name does not occur in normal sequence under the appropriate family history is identified in the index. Wherever possible, women are indexed under their maiden names.

A Genealogical and Biographical History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania – online 2/20/2009

Allegheny County, in southwestern Pennsylvania, was for many years a staging area of westward migration. Thousands of early pioneers passed through it and thousands more stayed. Representatives of many of these early settlers, perhaps the majority, are immortalized in this work in genealogical and biographical sketches. The sketches, numbering approximately 2,250 and naming a total of 50,000 related persons, generally treat subjects who were born in the early nineteenth century, with reference to immediate forebears of the late eighteenth century. The sketches typically mention the date and place of birth and marriage of the principal subject, the place of birth of his parents and often grandparents, sometimes the name of the first ancestor in America, and details of religion, education, military service, occupation, home, and residence. This publication is excerpted from Part II of the History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, constituting the entire genealogical and biographical section of that work, i.e. pages 209-786. As the index references correspond to the pages in the original, those page numbers have been retained in the reprint.

Genealogies of Virginia Families from Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical
Magazine, Volume 4
– online 2/23/2009

This is the fourth volume of a multi-volume work on Virginia genealogies consisting of material from Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, a notable periodical that contained a large number of genealogies that will be of help to the researcher. The four-volume set as all of the family history articles, about 350, that appeared in the magazine from its inception in 1919 until its demise in 1952. This is a significant body of genealogical material, and many of the contributors were leading Virginia researchers. For convenience the articles are arranged in a single alphabetical sequence. Since each volume has its own index, genealogists need only consult the particular volume required for their research. For a complete list of the contents write the publisher.

Hereditary Society Blue Book-online 2/23/2009 – online 2/23/2009

This publication furnishes current information on no fewer than 147 lineage organizations, their officers, and other members. In this sense it is both an annual Who’s Who among lineage society members and a guidebook for learning about the purpose of each organization and how to contact it. For each organization listed the author gives the name of the society, date of founding, requirements for membership, a mailing address and, where available, the phone number. In the majority of cases, Mr. Davenport also provides some historical background on the society, number of current members, and an illustration of the society’s insignia. The Who’s Who section lists over three hundred prominent living members of lineage societies, along with their spouses, addresses and phone numbers, and as many as ten hereditary societies of membership.

General Alphabetical Index to the Townlands and Towns, Parishes and Baronies of
Ireland, Based on the Census of Ireland for the Year 1851
– online 2/24/2009

In all genealogical work the first and most important step is to establish the geographical origin of the ancestor. In Irish research the genealogist may know the name of the county where the ancestor lived but be puzzled about a place name given as the place of birth or residence. In all probability the place-name is that of a townland, the smallest territorial subdivision in Ireland. Since research in Ireland will usually start at the parish level, there must be a reference tool that will key the townland to the parish in which it is located. This work was prepared under the auspices of the British government for almost that purpose. The over 900 densely printed pages show the county, barony, parish, and poor law union in which the 70,000 townlands were situated in 1851, as well as the location of the townlands on the Great Ordnance Survey maps, with appendixes containing separate indexes to parishes and baronies.

Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army from its Organization,
September 29, 1789 to March 2, 1903, Volume 2
– online 2/24/2009

Part 1 includes the following information: 1. Names of the Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Secretaries of War, and Commanding Generals of the Army, showing when and where each was born, exact period of service, and date and place of death. 2. List of general officers of the United States Army and of the United States Volunteers from June 1775 to 1903, arranged according to grade and rank, with period of service of each. 3. Complete chronological roster of chiefs of bureaus or staff corps, field and staff officers of the line (artillery, cavalry, dragoons, infantry, the legion, rangers, riflemen, sea fencibles, and voltigeurs), showing the acts of Congress under which each regiment or organization was created, with dates of consolidation, disbandment, etc. 4. Names of officers of the Army who have by name been thanked or presented with medals or swords by Congress since the organization of the Army in 1789. 5. Tables showing promotion of graduates of the United States Military Academy, and numbers in each class.

Part 2 includes: Complete alphabetical list of commissioned officers of the Army, including officers of the volunteer staff and brevet major or brigadier-generals of volunteers, from the organization of the Army, September 29, 1789, to March 2, 1903. It gives their full names and shows services as cadets and all services as officers or enlisted men, either in the regular or volunteer service. It also gives all brevet appointments, medals of honor awarded, and for what service conferred, Plus, it provides all cases in which thanks, swords, or medals have been awarded by Congress; all of said officers who joined the Confederate Army in the civil war, and the highest rank attained therein by each. Also look for the date of death of about 9,000 officers who died after leaving the United States service.

Part 3 includes: 1. Alphabetical list of officers of the Regular Army killed, wounded, or taken prisoner in action since 1789. 2. Alphabetical list of officers of volunteer regiments during the war with Mexico, 1846-1848. 3. Alphabetical list of field officers of volunteers and militia in the service of the United States during the Civil War, 186-1865. 4. Alphabetical list of captains of light batteries in the volunteer service during the Civil War, 1861-1865. 5. Alphabetical list of general officers of the United States Army and the Confederate States Army killed or died of wounds during the Civil War, 1861-1865. 6. Alphabetical list of general officers of the Confederate Army, 1861-1865. 7. Alphabetical list of officers who left the United States Army after November 1, 1860, and joined the Confederate service. 8. Alphabetical list of officers of volunteer organizations during the war with Spain and Philippine insurrection, 1898 to 1902, and alphabetical list of contract surgeons in service, 1898 to 1903. 9. Strength of the losses in battle, etc., during the following wars: War of the Evolution, 1775-1783; Indian wars, 1790-1795; war with Northwest Indians, 1811-1813; war with Great Britain, 1812-1815; Seminole war, 1817-1818; Black Hawk war, 1831-1832; Seminole war, 1835-1842; war with Mexico, 1846-1848; Civil War, or War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865; war with Spain and insurrection in the Philippines, 1898-1902, and insurrection in China, 1900-1901. 10. Alphabetical and chronological list of wars, campaigns, battles, skirmishes, military events, etc., 1775-1902. 11. Alphabetical list of forts, reservations, blockhouses, named camps, National and State Homes for soldiers, national cemeteries, etc., in the United States from its earliest settlement to date. 12. Compilation of tables illustrative of the (most important changes in the) organization of the Army of the United States from 1789 to 1902, and actual strength (annually) at stated periods since 1789.

History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Volume 1 (FREE FOR 10 DAYS) – online 2/25/2009)

This publication is a two-volume work created by Donald Lines Jacobus in the early 1930s.This work contains over 46,000 names of early Connecticut settlers and their descendents.

Supplement 1972 -1976 to Genealogies in the Library of Congress: A Bibliography – online 2/25/2009

This Supplement to Genealogies in the Library of Congress lists all genealogies in the Library of Congress that were catalogued between 1972 and 1976, showing acquisitions made by the Library in the five years since publication of the original two-volume Bibliography. Arranged alphabetically by family name, it adds several thousand works to the canon, clinching the Bibliography’s position as the premier finding-aid in genealogy.

Like the original two-volume work the Supplement is a guide to genealogical monographs that can be found in the Library of Congress and other libraries. It is also a guide to the Library’s own index to genealogies in sources not primarily genealogical in nature and a guide to the unique collection of non-printed genealogies held by the Library, other than those in its Manuscript Division. Its unique listing of genealogies is achieved by placing together family names that are pronounced alike, or almost alike, even though there are differences in spelling, providing the researcher with a foolproof look-up method.

“This supplement updates the two-volume set published in 1972. Together the set supersedes the various editions of American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress and provides over 23,000 genealogical entries and 30,000 cross references. The supplement alone includes 2,798 new entries for books added between 1972 and 1976. The alphabetical arrangement is by family surname for both the bibliographical entries and the cross references. Title, place, publisher, author, and LC card and call numbers are included. Comprehensive and easy to use, this work is a major starting point for identifying and approaching American, English, Canadian, Latin American, European, and Asian genealogical sources.” –Jimmie H. Hoover, American Reference Books Annual 1978

New Content From Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Kentucky, and More

Thursday, January 15th, 2009

This week’s major collection includes ten new databases filled with rich content from Genealogical Publishing Company. All of the U.S. content in this launch will be free to access for ten days. Descriptions of each database are provided, courtesy of Genealogical.com.

Census Returns, 1841–1881

The original books of enumerators’ returns for the censuses of 1841, 1851, 1861, 1871, 1881, and 1891 for England, Wales, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man are at the National Archives in Kew, southwest of London. Those for Scotland are in the General Register Office of Edinburgh, Scotland. Microfilm copies of selected portions of these six censuses are in libraries and record offices throughout Britain. This guide shows what microfilm is available and where, and it provides–county by county, library by library–a breakdown of local holdings and the registration districts that are covered.

British Roots of Maryland Families

In this new and comprehensive collection of genealogies, noted Maryland genealogist Robert Barnes has put together the most authoritative account of the British origins of Maryland families ever published. Families included in this groundbreaking work were chosen by Mr. Barnes based on the following criteria: (a) there was some reason to believe that the families’ home parish in Britain had been identified, (b) the families had taken root and left descendants in the New World, and (c) most had arrived before the year 1800. Source materials on which these genealogies are based derive from a combination of Mr. Barnes’s own extensive research over the past thirty years and the pioneering work on the origins of Maryland families made by earlier researchers such as Henry F. Waters, Lothrop Withington, Harry Wright Newman, Jack and Marion Kaminkow, and, more recently, Peter Wilson Coldham.

Some British sources used by Mr. Barnes include printed and manuscript genealogies, county histories and heraldic visitations, works on the peerage and landed gentry, and distinguished periodicals such as The Genealogist, Harleian Society Parish Register Series, and Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica. Clues in Maryland source records were discovered in land records, county and provincial court records, parish registers, probate records, printed and manuscript family histories, and in dozens of well-known periodicals specializing in genealogy and family history. The result is a world-class combination of genealogical source materials that extends the reach of Maryland genealogy well beyond what has been known up until this point.

Altogether this work contains information on nearly 500 individuals and families whose descendants came to Maryland. Many of the families, such as the Frowicks, Lewkenors, and Wroths, did not come to Maryland themselves but were ancestors through the marriage of daughters of those who did. Some families, such as the Blakistons, Towneleys, and Keenes, sent more than one individual to Maryland. One hundred and nineteen of the arrivals (24.1%) had a right to bear a coat of arms; 58 families (11.7%) had a well-proven royal descent, while another 73 (14.6%) had a professional, clerical, or mercantile background. The remaining families comprised indentured servants, convicts (only 6), and a number of individuals of undetermined status. More than half of all settlers came from London and the Home Counties and the northern counties of England.

In general, families are traced back two or more generations in England and brought forward two or more generations in Maryland. A clear, well-formatted text of more than 500 pages is followed by a 140-page index containing the names of 20,000 individuals–remarkable in themselves in that they can be said to have seeded the population of early Maryland.


British Roots of Maryland Families, Volume 2

British Roots II is the culmination of research that was undertaken after the publication in 1999 of British Roots of Maryland Families, the groundbreaking work that identified 500 individuals and families who seeded the early population of Maryland. Using the same format as the parent volume, British Roots II discusses the British origins of an additional 203 Maryland settlers and establishes connections to 120 settlers in other colonies. Its publication was necessitated by information that came to light after the publication of the first volume, important clues that enabled the compiler to extend his research in Britain and provide genealogical evidence relating to hundreds more families.

The families included in this work were chosen because (a) their home parish in Britain was identified, (b) the families had taken root and left descendants in Maryland, and (c) most had arrived well before the year 1800. Source materials on which the family histories are based derive from a combination of Mr. Barnes’s own extensive research over the past thirty years and the pioneering work on the origins of Maryland families made by earlier generations of researchers. In addition, Mr. Barnes has profited by the work made available to him by several distinguished contemporaries.

In general, families are traced back two or more generations in Britain and are brought forward two or more generations in Maryland. The specific British sources used by Mr. Barnes include printed and manuscript genealogies, county histories and heraldic visitations, works on the peerage and landed gentry, and, most importantly, marriage bonds and allegations published as part of the Harleian Society Visitation series. Clues in Maryland source records were discovered in land records, county and provincial court records, parish registers, probate records, and in printed and manuscript family histories.

A History of Watauga County, North Carolina
In the decade preceding the Revolutionary War, frontier settlers migrated into the western parts of North Carolina, settling on lands along the Watauga River that belonged to the Cherokee Indian Nation. Many were Scotch-Irish who had traveled to the area through the Shenandoah Valley down the Great Wagon Road, while others were settlers who wandered westward over the mountains after the collapse of the Regulator movement in North Carolina. In May 1772 these settlers, led by John Sevier and James Robertson, established the Watauga Association, which boasted the country’s first majority-rule system of government, and the first written constitution in America. The Watauga Association negotiated a ten-year lease with the Cherokees, and later purchased the land from the Indians. In 1776 the Watauga settlement was annexed to North Carolina, then was ceded to the federal government in 1784, briefly comprised the State of Franklin, and finally became part of Tennessee when it attained statehood in mid-1796.

Although Watauga County, North Carolina, was not established until 1849 from the existing counties of Ashe, Wilkes, Caldwell, and Yancey in northwestern North Carolina, “all of Watauga County on the waters of Watauga River was once a part…of the famous and immortal Old Watauga Settlement of Sevier . . . .” In his History of Watauga County, North Carolina, John Preston Arthur provides an invaluable study of the origins and early settlers of this area rich in genealogical history. Arthur’s History not only covers the topics standard to such histories–the first settlements, Indian raids, churches, Revolutionary and Civil War activities, geological facts, legislative and other officers, population and agricultural statistics, place names, schools, etc.–but also peppers his narrative with innumerable names of early settlers, biographical sketches, and anecdotes about county residents. One chapter of the book deals with Daniel Boone, who according to local tradition, “hunted all through the mountains of what is now Watauga County during several years preceding 1769, and knew the country thoroughly.”

Of particular interest to genealogists are biographical sketches of the following prominent Watauga County families: Adams, Baird, Banner, Bingham, Blackburn, Blair, Brown, Bryan or Bryant, Cable, Coffey, Cottrell, Councill, Critcher, Davis, Dugger, Eggers, Elrod, Farthing, Franklin, Gragg, Greene, Greer, Grider, Grubb, Hagaman, Hardin, Harman, Hartley, Hayes, Hodges, Holtzclaw, Horton, Ingram, Isaacs, Lenoir, Lewis, Linney, Lovill, McBride, McGhee, Mast, Miller, Moretz, Morphew, Norris, Penley, Perkins, Presnell, Reese, Rivers, Sands, Shearer, Sherrill, Shull, Smith, Story, Swift, Tatum, Tester, Thomas, Todd, Trivett, Tugman, Van Dyke, Vannoy, Ward, Watson, Welch, Wilson, Winebarger, Winkler, Woodring, and Yountz.

Ages from Court Records, 1636 – 1700: Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts
From thousands of court cases in Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, Massachusetts, dating from 1636 to 1700, Melinde Sanborn has extracted the names of all deponents and witnesses whose ages are given in the court records of those counties. Depositions provided in early court records are among the richest sources of personal information surviving from New England’s first century, and Ms. Sanborn argues that “so many people in early New England were deponents for one reason or another that no biography or genealogy can be complete without a search through court records to see if a pertinent deposition exists.”

For this early period, the single most useful bit of evidence included in the depositions is the age of the deponent. While most depositions vary in quality from being virtually useless to providing corroboration of marriages, wills, and deeds, ages alone provide incontrovertible value to the genealogist. Sometimes the age of a deponent was very important to a particular case. Men over sixty, for example, were often brought into court to support the claims of the ancient boundaries of litigants’ property. Likewise, many older women who were experienced midwives were called upon to offer opinions on the timeliness of a birth in a fornication case.

Also, one of the most common errors in genealogical work is confusing two or more individuals of the same name. If “senior” or “junior” or “tertius” is not used, it is very difficult to assign events to the correct individual. Frequently, fathers and sons with the same given name came to court together, but with stated ages they are easily differentiated. Men with the same name and of the same generation can be another problem, but again a deposition with a specific age given can make all the difference.With this index–which lists the names and ages of 11,000 deponents, and the year and source of the court records–researchers can quickly determine whether it is worthwhile to track down the original court record.


Schlegel’s American Families of German Ancestry in the United States, Volumes 1-3

This is a reprint of the largest collection of German-American genealogies ever published, a full-blown compendium of family history and biography unknown to all but a handful of specialists. The first three volumes were published somewhat inopportunely between 1916 and 1918, with a fourth volume added in 1926. Each volume was limited to 200 numbered and registered copies, and consequently only a dozen or so three-volume sets can be located today, while the fourth volume is all but unknown. This is a complete paradox, for like similar compendia by Virkus and McKenzie, this work should be available to all students of genealogy and should be the very first resource for anyone researching German-American ancestry.
Unlike other great compendia, however, Schlegel doesn’t just start out with the immigrant ancestor; rather, each family history usually begins two or three generations back, examining the family in its historic setting before bringing it forward to the immigrant ancestor and his descendants in America. Averaging about ten pages in length, including portraits and coats of arms, the family histories are no mere catalogues of births, marriages, and deaths but are rich biographical and genealogical studies, each depicting the education, service, achievements, life, and career of the various family members, and each tracing the roots of the first four or five generations in America, usually commencing in the 18th or the 19th century, naming thousands of related family members.

Of all the information-rich sources of German-American ancestry, none is this comprehensive or as useful to the researcher, as illustrated by its coverage of the following families:

Ackermann, Aichmann, Altenbrand, Ammann, Auer, Barkhausen, Bauer, Baumann, Becker, Bender, Bermel, Biertuempfel, Boos, Bossert, Brandis, Braunstein, Breidt, Broking, Burger, Cordts, Cronau, Dangler, Dannenhoffer, de Kalb, Deck, Dippel, Dittenhoefer, Dochtermann, Dornhoefer, Doscher, Draesel, Dreier, Dressel, Drewes, Dreyer, Eichacker, Eichhorn, Eimer, Engelhardt, Espenscheid, Faber, Faller, Fink, Fischer, Flammer, Focht-Vogt, Frank, Frey, Fritz, Froeb, Funk, Gaus, Gobel, Goebel, Goepel, Golsner, Grell, Gretsch, Groborsch, Gunther, Hauenstein, Haug, Haupt, Haussling, Havemeyer, Hechtenberg, Hecker, Helwig, Hering, Herkimer, Herlich, Herrmann, Hoecker, Hoffmann, Jaeckle, Jahn, Janson, Junge, Just, Katz, Keene, Kern, Kessler, Kiefer, Kircher, Kirsch, Kleinert, Kline, Kny, Kobbe, Kochersberger, Koelble, Komitsch, Korth, Kost, Koster, Kraemer, Kramer, Kroeger, Kuhn, Lafrentz, Lamprecht, Lausecker, Leisler, Lexow, Liebmann, Limbacher, Lohse, Lotz, Luckhardt, Luhrsen, Lutz, Marquardt, Martin, Maulbeck, Maurer, Meeker, Mehlin, Mende, Meurer, Meyer, Mielke, Mietz, Moeller, Moser, Mueller, Muhlenberg, Muller, Naeher, Nissen, Nungesser, Oberglock, Offermann, Otto, Pedersen, Peter, Pflug, Poppenhusen, Prahl, Rasch, Rath, Reichhelm, Reisinger, Reppenhagen, Reuter, Ridder, Riedman, Ries, Ringler, Roehr, Runkel, Ruoff, Sauerwein, Schaeffer, Schalck, Schering, Scherrer, Schieren, Schill, Schilling, Schissel, Schlegel, Schlitz, Schmelzer, Schmidt, Schmieder, Schneider, Scholzel, Schortau, Schrader, Schroeder, Schultz, Schumann, Schurz, Schwarz, Sebold, Seyfarth, Sigel, Solms, Specht, Spengler, Stadler, Steiger, Steil, Steingut, Steinway, Stemme, Stengel, Steubner, Steurer, Stiefel, Stier, Stohn, Strebel, Stuber, Stutz, Stutzmann, Sutro, Thumann, Vogeler, Vollweiler, vom Hofe, von Bernuth, von Briesen, von Steuben, Wahlers, Weber, Weimar, Weismann, Weitling, Wendel, Wenk, Wesel, Wilhelms, Wintjen, Wischmann, Wolffram, Zaabel, Zechiel, and Zobel

Craftsman of the Cumberlands, Tradition and Creativity
Sensitive, illustrated account of wood craftsmen in the Cumberland Mountains of southeastern Kentucky as reflected in the life and work of woodworker and chairmaker Chester Cornett. Describes not only Cornett’s tools and techniques but also his aspirations and values. Considers Cornett’s experience vis-Ã -vis other Cumberland craftsmen and their views about the world.

A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Volume 1

This is the basic genealogical dictionary of early New England settlers, giving the name of every settler who arrived in New England before 1692 regardless of their station, rank, or fortune. Alphabetically arranged for each, it gives the dates of his marriage and death, dates of birth, marriage and death of his children, and birthdates and names of the grandchildren. According to the author, “nineteen twentieths of the people of these New England colonies in 1775 were descendants of those found here in 1692, and probably seven-eighths of them were offspring of the settlers before 1642.”

Owners of this series will also want to purchase the newFemale Index to “Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England,” which indexes all the females scattered throughout Savage’s four volumes by both maiden and married names.

“Probably the greatest work on genealogy ever compiled for the New England area.”–P.W. Filby, American & British Genealogy & Heraldry

New Content from US, Mexico, and Chile

Wednesday, December 24th, 2008

The major collection this week includes 12 databases from Genealogical Publishing Company, as well as some content from Mexico and Chile. WorldVitalRecords.com partnered with Genealogical Publishing Company in March 2008. Genealogical Publishing Company, also known as Genealogical.com, publishes genealogy books and CDs for beginning genealogists, as well as experienced. Genealogical.com has published over 2,000 titles featuring colonial genealogy, Irish genealogy, immigration, royal ancestry, family history, and genealogy methods and sources. Some of the titles of the databases included in this week’s launch are listed below.

* El Apostolado de la Cruz (Mexico)
* El Arte Musical (Mexico)
* El Asesor Jurídico : Revista Popular de Jurisprudencia (Mexico)
* El Asilo de Mendigos (Mexico)
* El Bautista (León, Guanajuato, Mexico)
* El Celage (Mexico)
* El Centinela Espanol (Mexico)
* El Centinela (Hermosillo, Sonora) (Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico)
* El Chisme, Diario de la Tarde (Mexico)
* El Circulo Catolico (Mexico)
* El Combate (Mexico)
* El Comerciante Mexicano (The Mexican Trader) (Mexico)
* El Contemporaneo (Mexico)
* El Correo del Comercio (Mexico)
* El Correo Germanico (Mexico)

Individuals who wish to view the collection WorldVitalRecords.com has online from Genealogical.com can access the databases here. These records include family histories, court, land, and probate records, military records, birth, marriage and death records, immigration records, and reference materials.

Renowned Connecticut Town Vital Records Featured This Week

Thursday, December 18th, 2008

Ten volumes from the Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records, one of the largest genealogical compilations ever published, will be posted online this week as our Major Collection. WorldVitalRecords.com has already released 27 volumes of the 55-volume-set that covers 137 towns and includes 14,333 typed pages. The online version of this series is a result of WorldVitalRecord.com’s partnership with Genealogical Publishing Company.

The ten databases to be released this week represent about 265,000 individuals. Entries are in alphabetical order by town and given name, date of event, names of parents (in the case of births and sometimes deaths), names of both spouses (in the case of marriages). Sometimes information such as age, occupation, and specific place of residence are included.

The full collection of vital records (from the early 1600s to about 1850) was the life work of General Lucius Barnes Barbour, Connecticut Examiner of Public Records from 1911 to 1934. The original records are housed at the Connecticut State Library in Hartford. In 2002,Genealogical Publishing Company. released the final volumes in the series.

Lorraine Cook White is the general editor, and she worked with compilers such as Carol Magnuson, Marsh Carbaugh, Wilma Moore, and the Greater Omaha Genealogical Society featured in this week’s release.

Barbour Databases to be released this week. These databases will be free for ten days from their release date:

­December 18–Preston = About 30,700 names.

­December 18–Middleton = Covers half of the records of the city of Middletown, Connecticut, from the mid-17th century. About 28,000 names.

December 19–Newton = Identifies about 26,500 residents of Newtown, North Branford, and North Haven.

December 19–Sherman = Includes the towns of Sherman and Simsbury. About 22,000 records.

December 22–Stamford = More than 200 years of vital records of the town/city of Stamford. References to about 30,500 persons.

December 22–Orange = Contains about 27,000 records for Orange, Oxford, and Plainfield.

December 23–Plymouth = Covers the Connecticut towns of Plymouth and Pomfret, and refers to some 30,500 persons.

December 23–Sterling = Includes Sterling and Stratford, Connecticut, and brings together vital references to more than 24,500 individuals (some are from the 17th century)

December 24–Portland = Covers the towns of Portland, Prospect, Redding, and Ridgefield. References to about 30,200 persons.

December 24–Weston = Vital records from the towns of Weston, Westport, and Willington. Compiled by the Greater Omaha Genealogical Society.
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About Genealogical Publishing Company:
Genealogical Publishing Company and its affiliate, Clearfield Company, are the leading publishers of books and CDs on genealogy and family history. Their combined genealogy collection includes over 2,000 books and CDs featuring a wide range of materials on topics such as colonial genealogy, immigration, royal ancestry, and genealogy methods and sources.

Away Down South in Dixie Meets Scotland the Brave

Tuesday, August 5th, 2008

Genealogical Publishing Company installments at WorldVitalRecords.com increase depth and complexity of collections

The Major Collection for this week consists of a hundred databases brought about through the partnership between the Genealogical Publishing Company and FamilyLink.com, Inc.

Many of the records deal with areas in the southern United States such as Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. Others concern German and Scottish emigrants to New York, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania from the seventeenth century through to the early twentieth. Further records come from New Jersey, Kentucky, Michigan, Wisconsin, etc., and concern Native Americans, Mulattos, church records, and heraldry.

A notable collection within the databases to be posted this week includes an installment to the Barbour Collection, a set of vital records from Connecticut documenting families from the 1630’s (varies by location) to the 1850’s. (Click on Browse Recent Databases.)

A database important to those with relatives who lived outside of New York City would be The Early Records of the First Presbyterian Church at Goshen, New York, 1767 – 1885, which would help anyone with Scottish ancestors from Orange County, New York.

An unusual reference book within this collection is Myra Vanderpool Gormley’s Family Diseases: Are You At Risk? For anyone tracing health history, this is an invaluable introduction to the topic.

Look for these and other useful titles as the Genealogical Publishing Company collection grows on WorldVitalRecords.com. Any US titles are offered free for the first ten days.

South Carolina Black Research Aided by New Addition to WorldVitalRecords.com

Monday, July 14th, 2008

Southern research is notorious for its difficulty, especially when there seems to be more burned counties than surviving. The records of Blacks Found in the Deeds of Laurens & Newberry Counties, South Carolina: 1785 – 1827, were abstracted by Margaret Peckham Motes in an effort to help ease this problem. These records come from “deeds of gift, deeds of sale, mortgages, born free, and freed,” sections of Laurens County, SC Deed Books A-L and Newberry County, SC Deed Books A-G. All of the records in this collection are free for ten days.

When researching backwards in time from the present, methods used to find black ancestors often stop at the 1850 census due to this census’s use for the first time of names of all members of the household. Customs of the first half of the nineteenth and prior centuries often relegated blacks to a societal status where they would often be recorded as property. This, in turn, makes deed books and other similar volumes highly useful when trying to find out what happened to particular families. Blacks often have to trace the families of slave holders to find out what happened to their own ancestors, making deed books also extremely timely.

This is part of the most recent addition to the WorldVitalRecords.com collection, volumes from Genealogical Publishing Company, including volumes from Virginia, Kentucky, Georgia, and dealing with other ethnicities such as Irish, German, and Swiss. New light on ancestors can be shed from these books for researchers to find their families, and in turn, to make connections to the past that otherwise may be unavailable.