Archive for July, 2007

What to Bring When Working On-Site: Be Prepared Before You Go

Wednesday, July 18th, 2007

By Amanda Forson, WorldVitalRecords.com

Day 1: Bag- Look for a small messenger bag, backpack, or good-sized tote bag for carting essential supplies. Make sure it is lightweight, preferably water-proof, large enough to carry at least one spiral notebook or a three-ring binder with loose-leaf paper depending upon your preference. If you are into high-tech gadgets, make sure it is large enough to fit your laptop or padded for similar items such as PDA’s.

Day 2: Water Bottle- Make sure that you have a small water-bottle. Something big enough to handle the weather, (especially if you are working in the summer-time outdoors in a cemetery), but small enough to be portable, and if necessary, toss-able. In case you have to take it through a secure site where they do not allow outside water or fluids, you will not want your favorite water-bottle confiscated. The easiest thing to do is to bring along either one bottle of water (Arrowhead, Dasani, Evian, off-brands) and to stow it away in either an interior, insulated area of your bag, or in an outside pocket, depending upon what is allowed at the site. Make sure you bring water. Other fluids are tasty, but water re-hydrates when others may dehydrate.

Day 3: Research notebook - What good is going onsite if you can’t record what you find? This notebook needs to fit conveniently into the bag with room leftover as necessary for copies, water bottle; other items as necessary. Good research notebooks are sturdy, and preferably acid-free if they are not to be transferred to a laptop later. Having paper on hand is a necessary feature, no matter whether using a laptop or not. Laptops are great, but they have logistical problems such as needing power, and not all batteries will last for a lengthy period, depending upon how long one has access to the site.

Day 4: Pencils and pens- These may seem redundant and elementary, but they are both necessary tools. Pencils are great for archival work where nothing else is allowed. Pens are necessary otherwise, and this researcher prefers black as it is easily legible and the color of all official penned items for the US government. Type or style of pen is personal preference. Recommended pens are relatively inexpensive, but also do not skip, smudge, and are made by known manufacturers. A great way of remembering to bring this handy tool with you is to purchase a small key-chain pen. That style of pen can be attached to a key ring, and a researcher will never be without the handy, ever-ready instrument.

Day 5: Copy of abbreviated pedigree/family group sheet – This is not to say that the information contained on the pedigree charts and family group sheets have to be abbreviated, but go with only a few families in mind since more than likely there will not be enough time to work on every ancestor in one’s trees at one sitting. Take those relatives that are most likely to be found on site, and a few collateral lines… enough to jog one’s memory. There is a strong penchant for trying to bring along too much information in fear of not knowing enough at the time. Before going to the site, review the information known about these ancestors including collateral lines (preferably a night or two beforehand) and the material will be fresh in memory when one works with original documents, etc.

Day 6: Any necessary medications, protein bar, small individually wrapped hard candies, carry-pack of tissues, etc. – Many who research family lines have need of medication during the day at some point, or could have other medical conditions needing attention. Don’t forget about these when packing!

Day 7: As always, check WorldVitalRecords.com, but also call ahead to the society, library, archive, etc., and let them know that you are coming and ask about any special needs, requirements, fees, food locations, water, etc. for the site. Calling ahead also helps prepare librarians and archivists to have information more-pertinent to your research on-hand so that your trip will not be wasted if you find out that you need to request information in advance before you may be able to search it.

RootsTelevision Interviews David Lifferth, President, WorldVitalRecords.com, at Southern California Genealogy Jamboree

Tuesday, July 17th, 2007

RootsTelevision recently interviewed David, Lifferth, President, WorldVitalRecords.com at the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree.

Click here to listen to David Lifferth discuss features, and the future of WorldVitalRecords.com and FamilyLink.com. The interview was sponsored by RootsTelevision.com and was produced live at the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree.


Adding Color To Microfilmed Records

Friday, July 13th, 2007

firework

By Amanda Forson, WorldVitalRecords.com

Sometimes the depth perception needed to view a microfilmed record does not exist when the record transfers through the light and mirrors, becoming amplified on the slanted or flat microfilm reader table.

How to solve this conundrum and be able to see the hidden text with messages from our ancestors’ pasts? When confronted with a problem with the textural gradient , the correct tool to use is a simple piece of colored typing paper, preferably in yellow. Blue or green also show up well, though yellow is optimal.

Typing paper has a smooth surface, and often can be bought in single-page quantities… just enough for the researcher to use at the time of searching.

Construction paper has a little too much texture for some eyes (including mine) and removes the point of using the paper–increased clarity.

Scrap-booking paper, unless of a single shade, is also not recommended. The more solid the color, and the brighter, the better the contrast and the more the record “pops” from the solid projection.

My personal favorite color to use is a reasonable, pastel yellow. Offering clarity, it does not hurt my eyes with excessive brightness.

Neon paper may work better for researchers with the beginnings of disintegrated vision, but for those with better eyesight, all that is needed is color to squeeze out results from pages otherwise too withdrawn for good searchability.

“Human Depth Perception: Texture Gradient,” Hyperwave. (Graz University of Technology: Graz, Austria), 24 Jan1995. [Accessed 5 Jul 2007.] http://www2.iicm.tugraz.at/0×811bc833_0×000dacca.

WorldVitalRecords.com Launches 44 Databases Containing Vital Records (1654-1992) From Canada

Friday, July 13th, 2007

This week has been a great week for launching data at WorldVitalRecords.com. 44 new databases were launched today containing vital records from Canada. These databases will be free to access until July 22, 2007. The years of these records go from 1654-1992. The databases are from the Quintin Publications Library.

To access these databases, click here.

Paroisse Saint Ambroise de Kildare, 1832 – 1992, Volume 1.
Paroisse Saint Ambroise de Kildare, 1832 – 1992, Volume 2.
Paroisse Saint Damien de Brandon, 1867 – 1991.
Repertoire des Mariages du Comte Richmond, 1847 – 1950.
Repertoire des Mariages (Catholiques), Comte Sherbrooke, 1834 – 1970, Volume 1.
Repertoire des Mariages Comte Stanstead, 1848 – 1950.
Repertoire des Mariages de la Paroisse Notre Dame de Grace, Montreal, 1853 – 1982.
Repertoire des Mariages de la Paroisse Sacre Coeur, Montreal, 1874 – 1910.
Repertoire des Mariages de L’Ancienne Lorette, 1695 – 1966.
Repertoire des Mariages de L’Ile d’Orleans, 1679 – 1984.
Repertoire des Mariages de Trois Rivieres, 1654 – 1900.
Repertoire des Mariages de Valleyfield (Salaberry), 1855 – 1950.
Repertoire des Mariages du Comte Compton.
Repertoire des Sepultures de la Paroisse Sainte Monique de Nicolet, 1844 – 1982.
Saint Barthelemy Comte de Berthier, 1828 – 1992, Volume 2.
Saint Barthelemy Comte de Berthier, 1828 – 1992, Volume 3.
Saint Gabriel de Brandon Comte de Berthier, 1838 – 1900, Volume 1.
Saint Barthelemy Comte de Berthier, 1828 – 1992, Volume 1.
St Gabriel de Brandon Comte de Berthier, 1838 – 1900, Volume 2.
St. Alphonse Rodriguez Comte de Joliette, 1844 – 1991.
St. Charles Borromee Cathedrale de Joliette Comte de Joliette, 1876 – 1900, Volume 2.
St. Charles Borromee Cathedrale Joliette, 1843 – 1875.
St. Edouard (1863 – 1967), Issoudun (1903 – 1967).
St. Felix de Valois Comte de Joliette, 1843 – 1991, Volume 1.
St. Felix de Valois Comte de Joliette, 1843 – 1991, Volume 2.
St. Jean de Matha Comte de Berthier, 1855 – 1991, Volume 1.
St. Jean de Matha Comte de Berthier, 1855 – 1991, Volume 2.
St. Jean Port Joli, 1779 – 1980.
St. Pacome, 1852 – 1969.
St. Pamphile: Marriages, 1880 – 1972.
St. Roch de L’Achigan Comte de L’Assomption, 1787 – 1991, Volume 3.
St. Roch de L’Achigan Comte de L’Assomption, 1787 – 1991, Volume 4.
St. Roch de L’Achigan Comte de L’Assomption, 1787 – 1991, Volume 1.
St. Roch de L’Achigan Comte de L’Assomption, 1787 – 1991, Volume 2.
St. Thomas Comte de Joliette, 1841 – 1992, Volume 1.
St. Thomas Comte de Joliette, 1841 – 1992, Volume 2.
Ste Anne de Beaupre Baptisms, 1657 – 1980.
Ste Anne de Beaupre Burials, 1845 – 1979.
Ste. Anne de Beaupre Baptisms, 1657 – 1980, Volume 2.
Ste. Emelie de l’Energie Comte de Berthier, 1870 – 1992.
Ste. Julienne Mariages, Annotations, Baptemes, Sepultures, 1853 – 1986.
Ste. Melanie Comte de Joliette, 1832 – 1992, Volume 1.
Ste. Melanie Comte de Joliette, 1832 – 1992, Volume 2.

WorldVitalRecords.com Launches 64 New Databases Containing Canadian Marriage Records From 1620-1980

Thursday, July 12th, 2007

Since yesterday (July 11, 2007), WorldVitalRecords.com has launched 64 new databases!!! (We guarantee that we will launch at least one new database each business day, but we have been so excited to get this content online that we have been launching databases in droves!)

These databases contain Canadian marriage records ranging from 1620-1980. All of these databases will be available and free to access until July 21, 2007. They are from the Quintin Publications Collection.

Click here to access each of these databases.

July 11, 2007
Mariages de la Baie du Febvre, 1715 – 1966
Mariages de la Paroisse de la Purification Repentigny, 1669 – 1970
Mariages de La Paroisse de Sainte Genevieve de Perrefonds, 1741 – 1972
Mariages de la Paroisse de St. Antoine de Pade de Longueuil, 1701 – 1980
Mariages de la Paroisse de St. Francois de Sales Ile Jesus, 1702 – 1981
Mariages de la Paroisse de St. Paul, Montreal, 1874 – 1979
Mariages de la Paroisse du Bic, 1850 – 1976
Mariages de La Paroisse Notre Dame de Montreal, 1642 -1850, L – Z, Part 2
Mariages de la Paroisse Saint Laurent, Montreal, 1720 – 1974
Mariages de la Paroisse St. Cuthbert, Comte de Berthier, 1770 – 1983
Mariages de la Paroisse Ste. Elisabeth Comte de Berthier, 1802 – 1982
Mariages de la Region des Laurentides, 1879 – 1984
Mariages de la Ville de Levis, 1852 – 1950
Mariages de Lachute, 1883 – 1984
Mariages de Lauzon, 1679 – 1975
Mariages de Loretteville (1761-1969) et Village des Hurons (1904-1969)
Mariages de Notre Dame de Montreal, 1620 – 1900
Mariages de Notre Dame de Saint Hyacinthe, 177 – 1969
Mariages de Riviere Ouelle, 1672 – 1972
Mariages de Saint Hyacinthe, 1853 – 1950
Mariages de Saint Pascal de Kamouraska, 1827 – 1977
Mariages de Saint-Frederic, Drummondville, 1815 – 1965
Mariages de St Guillaume d’Upton (1835-1966), St. David d’Yamaska (1835-1966)
Mariages de St Ours (Immaculee Conception), 1750 – 1975
Mariages de St. Antoine sur Richelieu, 1741 – 1965
Mariages de St. Charles (1741-1967), St. Hilaire (1799-1967), St. Jean Baptiste (1797-1967), Otterburn Park (1960-1967)
Mariages de St. Francois du Lac, 1687 – 1965
Mariages de St. Jean Chrysostome (1830 – 1966), St. Romuald d’Etchemin (1854 – 1966)
Mariages de St. Michel d’Yamaska, 1727 – 1965
Mariages de St. Pierre de Sorel, 1675 – 1865
Mariages de St. Roch de Quebec, 1829 – 1900
Mariages de Ste. Cunegonde, Montreal, 1874 – 1978
Mariages de Ste. Flore, Comte St. Maurice, 1867 – 1977

JULY 12, 2007
Mariages de Vercheres, 1724 – 1966 Mariages du comte d’Argenteuil, 1833 – 1960
Mariages du Comte d’Argenteuil, 1833 – 1960, Volume 2
Mariages du Comte de Laprairie, 1751 – 1972
Mariages du Comte de L’Assomption, 1679 – 1960, Volume 1
Mariages du Comte de L’Assomption, 1679 – 1960, Volume 2
Mariages du Comte de L’Assomption, 1679 – 1960, Volume 3
Mariages du Comte de Missisquoi, 1846 – 1968
Mariages du Comte de Pontiac, 1836 – 1973
Mariages du Comte de Portneuf, 1679 – 1900
Mariages du Comte de Rouville, 1739 – 1968
Mariages du Comte de Rouville, 1801 – 1968
Mariages du Comte de Shefford, 1846 – 1968
Mariages du Comte de Soulange, 1752 – 1966
Mariages et Necrologe de Saint Vallier, 1713 – 1975
Mariages et Necrologe, St. Gervais, 1780 – 1973
Marriages in Bagot, Quebec, 1827 – 1968
Marriages in Bagot, Quebec, 1833 – 1968
Marriages in Rouville, Quebec, 1822 – 1967
Marriages in Vercheres County, Quebec 1772 – 1968
Marriages Lotbiniere County, 1867 – 1967
Marriages of Henryville, 1852 – 1970
Marriages of L’Enfant Jesus de la Pointe aux Trembles, 1674 – 1975
Marriages of N.D. de la Misericorde, Beauport, 1673 – 1966
Marriages of Notre Dame Sorel, 1911 – 1865
Marriages of St. Louis, 1739 – 1974
Marriages of St. Pierre de Sorel, 1865 – 1965
Marriages of Ste Julie, 1852 – 1965
Marriages of Ste. Genevieve de Berthier, 1826 – 1850, Volume 3
Naissances, Deces et Mariages de la Paroisse St. Mathieu de Rimouski, 1858 – 1985
Notre Dame de la Garde de Quebec, 1877 – 1977

10,000th Subscriber Contest: Win 10-Year Membership to WorldVitalRecords.com for the Price of 1

Thursday, July 12th, 2007

WorldVitalRecords.com is offering a special contest as it approaches its 10,000 subscriber milestone! Currently, WorldVitalRecords.com has more than 9,400 subscribers, and plans to make it to the 10,000 subscriber mark by the end of July.

Contest Details

Be the 10,000th person to subscribe to WorldVitalRecords.com and receive a 10-year subscription. Yes, that’s 10 years for the price of 1!

The winner will be announced in WorldVitalRecords.com’s newsletter the following week and will also be posted on the blog the day the 10,000th person subscribes.

Top Reasons to Subscribe to WorldVitalRecords.com:

  • Everton Online Library
  • SmallTownPapers® Collection
  • Quintin CDROM Library
  • International Parish Register Collection
  • World Gazetteer Collection
  • International Marriage World Collection
  • New Content Added Daily
  • Affordable Membership Cost

Be the 10,000th subscriber. Sign up NOW!

New Parish Records and Registers: Dwelly’s Parish Record, Gainford Parish Registers

Wednesday, July 11th, 2007

New parish records and registers from England are now available at WorldVitalRecords.com. These records will be free to access until July 18th and contain Dwelly’s Parish Records and Index to Gainford Parish Registers, Volume 1, Parts 1-3.

Dwelly’s Parish Records (Free until July 18, 2007)
Dwelly’s parish records contain Bishop’s Transcripts, monumental inscriptions in churchyards and churches, parish registers, and nonconformist registers. Great care has been taken to give all the surnames exactly as spelled in the originals.

Index to Gainford Parish Register, Volume 1, Part 1 (Free until July 18, 2007)
The Index of the Gainford Registers, Vol. 1, Part 1 contains the records for baptisms in the Gainford Parish. It covers the years 1560-1784. The Parish of Gainford consists of the townships of Gainford(including the districts of Alwent and Selaby), Piercebridge, Bolam, Morton, Tinmouth, Summerhouse, Headlam, Langton, and part of Cleatlam. These are all in the county and diocese of Durham. The records are par of the Everton Library Collection.

Index of the Gainford Registers, Vol.1, Part 2 (Free until July 18, 2007)
The Index of the Gainford Registers, Vol. 1, Part 2 contains the records for marriages in the Gainford Parish. It covers the years 1569-1761. The Parish of Gainford consists of the townships of Gainford (including the districts of Alwent and Selaby), Piercebridge, Bolam, Morton, Tinmouth, Summerhouse, Headlam, Langton, and part of Cleatlam. These are all in the county and diocese of Durham.

Index to Gainford Parish Register, Volume 1, Part 3 (Free until July 18, 2007)
The Index of the Gainford Registers, Vol. 1, Part 3 contains the records for burials in the Gainford Parish. It covers the years 1569-1784. The Parish of Gainford consists of the townships of Gainford(including the districts of Alwent and Selaby), Piercebridge, Bolam, Morton, Tinmouth, Summerhouse, Headlam, Langton, and part of Cleatlam. These are all in the county and diocese of Durham.

Vital Records and Histories from Quebec, Canada, Free to Access Until July 19th

Wednesday, July 11th, 2007

WorldVitalRecords.com recently launched 10 new databases containing marriage and birth records, as well as historical material. These databases will be free to access until July 19, 2007. The paragraphs below give a brief description of the databases.

Click on the links to acccess each database.

Chateau Richer: Repertoire des Mariages, 1661 – 1977 (Free until July 19, 2007)
Chateau-Richer is a small town situated in the Capitale-Nationale region of Quebec. Located on the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River east of Quebec City, Chateau-Richer is the seat for the Ca´te-de-Beaupra© Regional County Municipality. The first rural parish in New France was established there in 1678 and many of the oldest families in Quebec first settled there. Even today, a fairly large segment of the town’s population can be traced back to those pioneering families.

Index of Irish Marriages, Saint Patrick’s Parish, Quebec, 1856 – 1973, Volume 3 (Free until July 19, 2007)
Index of Irish Marriages, Volume III Part I (ABB-JOY) St-Patrick’s Parish, Quebec 1856-1973. This book is a compilation of all marriages in the registers of St. Patrick’s Church on McMahon Street and on Grande Allac, from 1854 up to and including 1973. These are not all Irish marriages, there are some English and Scottish Marriages, as well as French-Canadians, Germans, and some Slavs who married English-speaking people.

Births, Marriages and Burials of St. Mathieu, 1858 – 1985
(Free until July 19, 2007)
Saint-Mathieu-de-Rioux is a municipality-parish in the regional municipality of the Basques county, in Quebec (Canada), located in the administrative area of the Bas-Saint-Laurent located to the east of Trois-Pistoles.

Mariages de Contrecoeur (1668 – 1966), St. Roch sur Richelieu (1859 – 1966)
(Free until July 19, 2007)
Compiled by Irenee Jette. Quebec: B Pontbriand 1968. 181 pages. From the Quintin Publications Collection.

Mariages de Diocese de Saint Hyacinthe, 1823 – 1876 (Free until July 19, 2007)
Saint-Hyacinthe is a city in southwestern Quebec east of Montreal on the Yamaska River. In 1849 Saint-Hyacinthe was created a village; at the time it had a population of 10,200. A year later it was made a town, and in 1857 it was made a city. Saint-Damase: St-Damase (1823-1967), Ste -Madeleine: Ste-Marie-Madeleine (1876-1967), St -Pie: St-Pie [Bagot County] (1830-1967).

Mariages de Granby, 1844 – 1970
(Free until July 19, 2007)
Granby – All Catholic parishes within the city, marriages (1844-1970). 500 pages. Granby is a city in southwestern Quebec, located east of Montreal on Lac Boivin. Granby is the seat of La Haute-Yamaska Regional County Municipality. The city is named after John Manners, Marquess of Granby and is the hometown of “Canadian Jos. St-Onge”, a well known prize fighter in the 20’s and 30’s. The city was settled at the end of the 18th century by three brothers whose name the city commemorated for a while as Frost Village. It became an incorporated municipality in 1816 and a city in 1971.

Mariages de Comte de St. Hyacinthe, 1806 – 1967
(Free until July 19, 2007)
Saint-Hyacinthe is a city in southwestern Quebec east of Montreal on the Yamaska River. In 1849 Saint-Hyacinthe was created a village; at the time it had a population of 10,200. A year later it was made a town, and in 1857 it was made a city. La Présentation: La-Presentation-de-la-Ste-Vierge (1806-1967), St -Jude: St-Jude (1822-1967), St -Barnabé-Sud: St-Barnabe (1840-1967), St -Thomas d’Aquin: St-Thomas-d’Acquin (1891-1967), St -Bernard-de-Michaudville: St-Bernard (1908-1967).

Le Dictionnaire des Familles de Saint Didace
(Free until July 19, 2007)
St-Didace: St-Didace (1820-1968). 360 pages. This item is a genealogical dictionary that includes not only historical material but great amounts of genealogical material. The format is similar to the Tanguay dictionary and is alphabetically arranged by family. Voluminous amounts of information is presented.

La Visitation, Ile Dupas, Co. Berthier, 1704 -1989 (Free until July 19, 2007)
Société de Généalogie de Lanaudière, publication no. 31. Ile-du-Pas : La Visitationÿ (B) (M) (S) (A) 1704-1898)

Famille Chouinard, Histoire et Genealogie (Free until July 19, 2007)
Famille Chouinard Histoire et Généalogie. Jean-Ba[tiste Chouinard. Quebéc: Imprimerie Franciscaine Missionnaire, 1921. 363 pages. From the Quintin Publications Collection

Lippincott’s Gazetteer of the World Online at WorldVitalRecords.com

Tuesday, July 10th, 2007
Henry house

(1895) Lippincott’s Gazetteer of the World. A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer, or Geographical Dictionary of the World is WorldVitalRecords.com’s Wonderbase of the Week and will be free to access until July 17, 2007.

The database contains notices of over one hundred and twenty-five thousand places, with recent and authentic information respecting the countries, islands, rivers, mountains, cities, towns, etc. in every portion of the globe.

“In the preparation of this edition of LIPPINCOTT’S PRONOUNCING GAZETTEER OF THE WORLD, not only have notices of a large number of new places been now for the first time included in its pages, – places that were unknown when former editions were issued, – but the contents of the entire volume have been subjected to such a thorough revision as, it is believed , will easily maintain for it the position, which it has so long occupied, of being without a rival among works of its class in the English language.”

The database was originally edited by Joseph Thomas, M.D., Revised edition. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, 1895, 2,895 pages.

New Family Histories: Chandler, Coolbaugh, Downes, Gilmore, Land, Henry, Hobart, Reynder, Turner, and Whipple

Monday, July 9th, 2007

WorldVitalRecords.com recently launched the following new databases:

Downes in Shropshire and Pedigree of the Author’s Family(Free until July 15, 2007)
Researches into the Genealogical History of Families Bearing the Name of Downes; Early Records of the Downes’ Families; Downes in Shropshire and Pedigree of the Author’s Family., Downes, Leonard., (1891).


The Chandler Family (Free until July 15, 2007)

John Chandler

The Chandler Family. The Descendants of William and Annis Chandler Who Settled in Roxbury Massachusetts 1637., Chandler George (1883)

This genealogical collection of the descendants of William and Annis Chandler is offered to the present and coming generations of that family by the compiler, as his contribution to their interests and happiness, in pious remembrance of those who have passed on in their earthly pilgrimage. This race of people have been generally good citizens, and have acted well their parts in life, as the writer has learned by his intercourse with members of eight of its eleven generations in America.

Of the second generation, Hannah (Abbot), Thomas and William Chandler, who came with their parents, settled before 1650 in Andover, Mass. Some of their descendants, in the fourth and fifth generations, removed to places unknown to the writer of this; but John Chandler, the other brother, settled in Woodstock, Conn., in 1686. Of his descendants it is believed that every branch has been traced to its very twigs Sarah remained, it is supposed, in Roxbury, Mass., where she w as born.

In the History of Roxbury it is said: ‘It has been remarked that no people can boost of more honorable descent than those of Massachusetts, and the Roxbury people were the best that came.”

The arrangement of this genealogy is in consecutive generations and the numbering is by priority of birth to each of the eleven generations. Every Chandler has a cardinal number, which (if much is said about the individual) is carried forward in its order and is placed at the head of his or her family, whose pedigree, in the male line, is there shown in parentheses on the right.

A Record of the Descendants of Simon Henry, 1766-1854(Free until July 15, 2007)


Henry house

A Record of the Descendants of Simon Henry (1766-1854) and Rhoda Parsons (1774-1847), His Wife, With Appendices Containing Some Account of Their Ancestry and of Collateral Lines. Being a Contribution towards a Comprehensive Genealogy of the Descendants of Sergeant John Henry, Freeman, of Topsfield, Massachusetts, 1690. Frederick A. Henry. (1905)

The author said the following about the Henrys:

“Now the Henrys are emphatically not of the Orient. All along the westward course of empire they have been and still are pioneers. Of the Occident are they, and thoroughbred withal; for 200 years of unmixed American blood surges through their veins. Yet an honorable ancestry, a countless posterity, and a set way, are their three-fold birthright.”

Genealogy of the Descendants of Humphrey Turner (Free until July 15, 2007)
Genealogy of the Descendants of Humphrey Turner with Family Records. Two Parts bound together. Turner, Jacob (1852).

The author said about the database: “The great object of the Compiler of the following work has been to give the descendants of Humphrey Turner, according to their generations and families, in as plain and convenient manner as possible.

Part I gives his male descendants in a general form, so far as they could be readily obtained; and the females in each family are named, but not their descendants, until we reach the fifth generation.

Part II contains several series of Family Records in detail, giving dates of Births, Marriages, Deaths, etc., commencing as far back as authentic records could be found. The descendants of both males and females are brought down to the present time, – including husbands and wives who have married into Turner families and their descendants.

With a consciousness of having endeavored to do the subject justice, and with all due deference, the book is submitted to the candor and indulgence of those who have patronized the undertaking.” – Jacob Turner

Memoranda Relating to the Land, Reynder and Whipple Families (Free until July 15, 2007)
Memoranda Relating to the Lane, Reyner and Whipple Families, Yorkshire and Massachusetts. (Reprint from NEHG Register, 1857)., Whitmore, W. H (1857)

An except from the beginning of the database:

Lane Family Papers

Dear Sirs –
I am very glad to have the opportunity to call your attention to the following papers relating to the Lane family of this vicinity. These documents are now in the custody of Mr. A.B. Cutler of Bedford, Mass., whose father-in-law, being the lineal descendant of Job, Lane, and residing on the old Lane farm, thus preserved them from being scattered and destroyed….

The following signatures and seals were attached to the deed in 1742. The signers are Mary Whitmore, daughter of John Lane, and widow of John Whitmore of Medford,) her two sons and their wives, Mary Hall and Mary Brooks. The seal is repeated against each name.

The Direct Line of Descent from John Gilmore
(Free until July 15, 2007)
Gilmore Ancestry of the Direct Line of Descent from John Gilmore, the Massachusetts Immigrant Ancestor, to Pascal Pearl Gilmore and His Grandchildren, etc. Also, The Same in the corresponding Lines of Pearl, Coombs and Spofford, Gilmore, Pascal P., (1925)

The author, Pascal P. Gilmore said, “The showing of a direct and unbroken line of descent from the immigrant ancestors of the four families of Gilmore, Pearl, Coombs and Spofford, covering a period of nearly three hundred years is unique, and will we think, be appreciated. Perhaps it is superfluous to say that this comes far short of our dreams of fifty years ago, although in some respects it equals or exceeds the original idea.

Some have been included who logically had no place, but are mentioned, partly from sentiment and partly because reference to them might be helpful to readers or students of the future. None however, have been excluded who, considering the scope of the work, had a right to appear in these pages.”

Coolbaugh Family in America, 1686 – 1938 (Free until July 18, 2007)
The Coolbaugh family in America contains records from their earliest appearance at New Amsterdam 1686-1938. The database includes a genealogical register of the descendants of William Coolbaugh Revolutionary Patriot., Hoagland, Edward C (1938).

Hobart History and Genealogy 1632-1912
(Free until July 18, 2007)
Hobart History and Genealogy 1632 to 1912 contains a resume portraying the meanderings of the Hobarts emanating from Edmund Hobart, an Englishman, who came to America and settled in Bea Cove, (Hingham), Massachusetts in 1632. Edwin L. Hobart. (1912).